News

Sat
19
Jan

Green Bay Diocese releases names of priests accused of sex abuse


The Associated Press Rev. John Girotti, vicar for canonical services for the Diocese of Green Bay, left, discusses the release of names of priests accused of abuse Thursday at the Diocese of Green Bay offices in Allouez. At right is Bishop David L. Ricken and diocese chancellor Tammy Basten. The diocese has released the names of more than 40 clergy members with substantiated allegations they sexually abused a minor.

The Catholic Diocese of Green Bay has released a list of 46 priests accused of sexual abuse of a minor over a time span stretching back decades, including some who served in Shawano County and surrounding areas.

The list comprises the names of incardinated priests of the diocese against whom there was one or more substantiated allegations. The list does not include priests ordained for service within a religious order.

According to the diocese, there are currently no known priests serving in active ministry in the diocese who have had a substantiated allegation of the sexual abuse of a minor against them.

“Many of the substantiated allegations were made decades after the alleged abuse took place, making it difficult to conduct a complete civil or church investigation,” according to a statement from the diocese.

Sat
19
Jan

Victim support group calls for broader probe of abusive clergy

A sexual abuse survivors support group is calling for a broader investigation of abuse claims against clergy after the Catholic Diocese of Green Bay released the names of 46 priests who had substantiated claims of abuse leveled against them over a span of decades.

SNAP, the Survivors Network, issued a statement Thursday calling on the state attorney general to conduct an independent investigation.

SNAP maintains the diocese carefully curated the list, “leaving off names of priests who are accused because they do not meet the diocese’s ever-changing and nebulous definition of ‘credible.’”

The group also called on Bishop David Ricken to expand the list to include any religious order priests who have spent time in Green Bay, even if they offended elsewhere.

Sat
19
Jan

Cox, Frechette re-elected to Tribal Legislature

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin has released the results of elections held Wednesday and Thursday for three positions on the Menominee Tribal Legislature.

Douglas Cox Sr., Pershing “Sport” Frechette, and Gunnar Peters were each elected to three-year terms.

Cox, the current chairman, and Frechette are incumbents who will now serve a second term. Peters is new to the Tribal Legislature.

The three will be sworn into office at the Tribal Legislature’s Reorganization Meeting on Feb. 9 at 10 a.m. at the Menominee Convention Center in Keshena.

Following the swearing-in ceremonies, the nine-member Tribal Legislature will select a chairperson, vice-chairperson and secretary for the new legislative year.

In addition to Cox and Frechette, the members of Tribe’s current governing body include Vice Chairman Craig Corn, Secretary Crystal Chapman-Chevalier, Legislators Eugene Caldwell, Ron Corn Sr., Gary Besaw, Joan Delabreau, and Myrna Warrington.

Sat
19
Jan

An ocean of orange


Leader Photo by Carol Ryczek Barrels line much of East Green Bay Street in Shawano as gas main repairs continue, but improvements may be coming soon.

Shawano drivers are hoping that We Energies will roll out the barrels — soon.

Bright orange cones and barrels are lining long stretches of East Green Bay Street as We Energies replaces gas lines under the street. Scott Kroening, director of public works for the city of Shawano, said the city is working with We Energies to reduce the number of barrels out at any given time.

“The concerns from the city are large work zones without anyone working,” Kroening said. He noted that he is working with WE Energies to “to shrink these down” and only block off areas where active work is going on.

We Energies is replacing gas mains in anticipation of a Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) project on East Green Bay Street later this year. The original completion date for this part of the project had been the end of November, but Kroening said the timetable had to be extended.

Sat
19
Jan

Clintonville police chief retiring in April


Photo by Grace Kirchner James Beggs will be retiring from the Clintonville Police Department on April 19. Beggs has been with the department for 44 years.

When Clintonville Police Chief James Beggs retires April 19, he will have worked for the police department for 44 years, making him the longest serving police officer in the department.

Beggs was tapped to replace Terry Lorge as police chief when Lorge retired in April 2016. For more than 20 years, he had been the captain and worked very closely with Lorge.

Beggs was hired by Clintonville in 1975. He said he always wanted to pursue a career as a police officer and felt the calling, but he got sidetracked for a while after his high school guidance counselor, Pete Fiera, urged him to pursue a career in chemistry as he scored high on math and physics on his SAT exam. As a result, he enrolled with University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point planning to major in paper science.

Sat
19
Jan

Public Record

Shawano Police Department

Jan. 17

Police logged 24 incidents, including the following:

Juvenile — Police responded to a juvenile problem at Park Street and Lieg Avenue.

Disturbance — Police responded to disturbances in the 400 block of East Division Street and 900 block of South Lincoln Street.

Warrant — A 44-year-old man was taken into custody at the probation and parole offices, 1340 E. Green Bay St.

Accident — Police responded to a property damage accident in the 500 block of South Main Street.

OAR — A 25-year-old woman was cited for operating after revocation at Lieg Avenue and Lafayette Street.

Shawano County Sheriff’s Department

Jan. 17

Deputies logged 42 incidents, including the following:

OWS — A 34-year-old Menasha woman was cited for operating while suspended on state Highway 47 in the town of Lessor.

Auto Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen on Ah Toh Wuk Circle in Bowler.

Sat
19
Jan

Annual quilt show opens at the WOWSPACE

A quilt entered in the Chicago World’s Fair in 1933 will be on display at the annual Walls of Wittenberg quilt show, which opens Saturday and continues through Feb. 3 at the WOWSPACE in Wittenberg.

“The Art of the Quilter V: Stitches in Time” will also feature a variety of quilts from local quilters.

Erma Schmidt, of Birnamwood, was a farmer’s wife busy with four children when she created the quilt for the Century of Progress International Exposition. She received a green ribbon (fifth place) for her handiwork.

“It feels wonderfully amazing to have my grandmother’s quilt featured at the quilt show,” said Karen Schairer, of Birnamwood. “She was a very special and hardworking lady who would have been very humbled at having her work displayed. I’m so proud of her.”

Sat
19
Jan

Chamber lunch focuses on keeping data safe

The Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce will present “Tips and Best Practices to Keep Your Data Safe” on Feb. 7 from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber, 1263 S. Main St., Shawano.

While cyber attacks and natural disasters do happen and get the most attention, data needs to be protected for simpler more mundane reasons, such as equipment failure, employee malfeasance and even simple keyboard mistakes.

Todd Tahlier with Nsight Telservices and James Mason Sr., sales engineer for Datto, will discuss three key data and network protection points as well as the concept of 3-2-1 backups and why they are essential for businesses.

They will present key take-a-ways to make the digital environment productive, secure and resilient.

Fri
18
Jan

Tribes keep federal programs running—for now

Local Native American tribes are keeping federally supported programs going with tribal dollars during the U.S. government shutdown, but there’s no estimate on how long they can afford to do that.

Tribal leaders are also concerned about federal food assistance programs for tribal members that will run out of money at the end of February.

The shutdown is the longest in U.S. history and will reach 28 days on Friday.

“To this point, we haven’t actually disrupted services, but obviously we’re closely monitoring things,” Stockbridge-Munsee President Shannon Holsey said.

About about 40 percent of the tribe’s operations depend on federal funds through trust and treaty agreements with the government.

“Right now we have about a little under $1 million outstanding to us,” Holsey said. “Every day we go without that offset it obviously becomes more taxing and concerning to us.”

Fri
18
Jan

Tribe appeals mine ruling

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin filed a court appeal Thursday in a bid to protect its ancestral homeland and sacred sites from a zinc and gold mine on the banks of the Menominee River.

Canadian mining company Aquila Resources, Inc. holds permits to build the Back Forty Mine, an open pit mine and minerals processing facility on the Michigan side of the Menominee River. The river forms part of the border between Wisconsin and Michigan and empties into Green Bay in Lake Michigan.

The tribe, represented by the nonprofit environmental law firm Earthjustice, filed in the federal Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals to appeal a December decision from the Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin that dismissed the tribe’s claims against the federal government.

According to Earthjustice, the mine would be located within the ancestral homelands of the Menominee Tribe.

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