Community

Sat
19
Jan

Farm life turns kids into lifelong workers

Being raised on a farm, we four kids developed a solid work ethic. We just knew how to work. My folks instilled that in us from early on. There was work to do, and we had to pitch in and help. No matter how we felt, even from little on, there were animals to feed, clean and tend. We watched our parents handle morning and night chores; year-round tending to livestock and crops through thick and thin, in all kinds of weather, sick or healthy. According to age, we stepped in and helped out.

Because us kids had to work didn’t mean we didn’t take shortcuts whenever possible. One day, my brother and I were cleaning out a calf pen. I was starting to shake apart wafers from a straw bale with a three-tined fork. Back in the day, we used baled straw for bedding.

“Kay! Wait, let’s let them do it!”

Sat
19
Jan

Family history can be found in stories, documents

Having a cluttered house means I will never become bored. I had been planning to tackle a cabinet, in the basement, for the past year. Finally, the cleaning itch arrived. A couple of things happen when I get the clutter-cleaning itch. First of all, I have to make myself be in the “get rid of it” mood. Yet, I admit that I am also on the lookout for things that I know I have, but can’t find. Such was my quest this past week.

I have lived here since 2005, so I am sure that none of the old farm taxes or slips will be needed for any type of audit. The four-drawer file cabinet is full of those, plus maybe more. I had to be methodical in dealing with the records; some needed to be burned or shredded, but others could go in the recycle bin.

Sat
19
Jan

Many helped make Red Kettle campaign a success

To the editor:

The Red Kettle Campaign, which raised money for the local work of the Salvation Army, touched many lives this season. In the next year, the money will touch the lives of some of our neighbors who will not have money for basic needs.

There are many reasons why this might happen. It may have happened to you once. No matter what the reason, they will need help somehow. It would be good, when they reach out, if we are there to assist them.

The Red Kettle Campaign touched the lives of each person who slid coins or currency through the slot. Perhaps you were one of those generous souls. If you were, thank you. Thank you for sharing your plenty with others who have little.

Were you one of those who wore the red apron or rang the bell to say thank you to joyful givers? Thank you.

Sat
19
Jan

Grandparents put the ‘good’ in good old days

I loved staying at my grandma’s house when I was a young girl in the 1950s. I spent a lot of time in Grandma’s kitchen. Grandma’s cupboards were dark wood — oak, I think. The paper she lined her shelves with had a pretty border that hung over the shelf’s edge.

Grandma’s dishes were dark brown pottery. She had some shiny orange bowls; I believe they were carnival glass. She had some nice platters and dishes from Ecke’s store, too. I remember her water pitcher with painted flowers. On a hot day, Grandma would fill the pitcher with homemade grape or apple juice.

There was a flour bin in Grandma’s cupboard. It fascinated me. She used a big metal scoop to get the flour out of the bin. You would never find a “store bought” loaf of bread in my grandma’s house. I watched as she put the dough in her bread pans and covered them up with a big white “flour sack” dish towel.

Sat
19
Jan

Food producers invited to FRESH project meeting

The FRESH Project will host its second local food producer meeting on Feb. 5 from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the United Cooperative, Shawano Agronomy Location Conference Room, 1212 Bay Lakes Road, Shawano.

All farmers and meat and vegetable producers are invited for lunch and to participate in discussions to include The FRESH Project’s mobile market, scheduled for a pilot program this summer; branding of Shawano Country agricultural products, winter farmers market, and a local food cooperative.

To attend, contact Barbara Mendoza at barbara@thefreshproject.org or by calling 715-526-5206 by Feb. 1.

The project’s work, including the mobile market, is made possible through the support of the Community Foundation of the Fox Valley Region and community and private donations.

Sat
19
Jan

Rural Marion church to host healing conference

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church-Big Falls will be hosting a healing conference Feb. 9 from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

This all-day conference is for anyone who wants to learn how to use faith-based practices to heal the sick, and is training for anyone who is interested in ministering in healing rooms.

All are welcome to attend who desire to learn and understand more about faith-based healing. In addition, the conference concludes with ministry time for anyone who would like to receive prayers for healing.

Dave and Kathy Werner, directors of the Healing Rooms of Green Bay and the Wisconsin state directors of the International Association of Healing Rooms headquartered in Spokane, Washington, will present the Healing the Sick Conference with teaching, testimonies, demonstrations, and ministry.

Topics include provision for healing, authority of the believer, roadblocks to healing, how God can use individuals to heal the sick and the anointing that empowers.

Fri
18
Jan

CMN taking part in CSA


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Maydene McDougal, who owns and operates McDougal’s Farm with her husband, Jerry, describes some of the vegetables she grows on her farm, a community-supported agriculture operation, as she shows off one of the boxes she provides shareholders with each week. The College of Menominee Nation is sponsoring 30 shares for area low-income families as part of a pilot program.

The College of Menominee Nation is testing a pilot program in 2019 in the hope of keeping those who live on the reservation more healthy.

The college is sponsoring 30 shares of a community-supported agriculture program run by McDougal Farm in Deerbrook. Qualifying families that sign up will be able to receive a free box of vegetables on a bi-weekly basis over an 18-week growing season.

“The college received some funding to do this so we could see what the interest is as far as a CSA,” said Brian Kowalkowski, CMN’s dean of continuing education. “We didn’t realize we were going to create such a relationship with the McDougals. If we stopped now, we would be way ahead of the game because what they’ve brought to us already is awesome.”

Fri
18
Jan

Clintonville Area Foundation to distribute grants

The Clintonville Area Foundation welcomes the community to join them in celebrating the distribution of grants to several local organizations. These grants are awarded from the Clintonville Community Fund, one of 27 funds managed by the foundation.

This has become a yearly rite for the organization that has grown from humble beginnings. Last year, the total assets of the foundation exceeded $1 million for the first time. The assets represent the total value of all charitable funds under administration by the foundation, which generate grant dollars that are used to improve the community.

Wed
16
Jan

Bowling fundraiser set for Saturday

Big Brothers Big Sisters of Northeast Wisconsin invites the community to Bowl For Kids’ Sake on Saturday Jan. 19 at Lakeshore Lanes.

The event is the agency’s signature fundraiser combining bowling and team spirit with a pledge drive to support youth mentoring in Shawano County.

The fourth annual event takes participants to “Infinity and Beyond.” The outer space theme encourages teams to dress the part of their favorite outer space icons — planets and the Milky Way, aliens and astronauts or characters from popular TV shows and movies, such as “Star Trek” or “Star Wars.”

Company and team sponsorships, combined with individual bowlers who raise pledges, will help raise money to support programming for this year.

Sat
12
Jan

Winters not as brutal as they were in years past

In thinking back to winters of my youth, I can’t recall any Januarys such as the one we are currently living. The point can be made, that we aren’t even halfway through as yet, and cold and snow could be on its way, but as for me, I am thinking about being 9 years old on a small farm between Clintonville and Marion.

Winters came hard in those days, but this little girl was snuggled under a wool quilt, and Pa had the furnace fired up warm for those cold winter nights. Ma had spent time knitting woolen socks, mittens, scarves and caps, and with multiple layers of clothing, I was well prepared for the cold outside.

After being bundled up, I’d go down to the barn and feed the calves, then give ground feed to the cows. The heat of the cattle kept the barn at a cozy temperature. I took some time in the barn to cuddle with kittens.

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