Community

Fri
24
May

INDIGENOUS AND DELICIOUS


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Chef Francisco Alegria speaks with visitors to the Menikanaehkem booth on May 18 at Menominee Indian High School. Alegria demonstrated how to make an indigenous acorn squash dish that is healthy and organic.

Good health through good eating is one of the focuses of the Menominee Tribal Department of Agriculture and Food System (DAFS).

To that end, the department brought professional Menominee chef Francisco Alegria out recently to the Gathering of Warriors Pow Wow in Keshena to talk with tribal members, both in person and live on Facebook to speak about the importance of eating indigenous foods. Alegria gave a cooking demonstration at the booth for Menikanaehkem, a grassroots organization trying to improve community wellness on the Menominee reservation.

“We’re pushing indigenous, decolonized food,” Alegria said. “We love frybread like everyone else, but we’re pushing people to put the frybread down because that’s not who we were as indigenous people prior to colonization.”

Fri
24
May

Spring activity brimming on the farm

Before I get into my column for the week, I want to thank our amazing military, remembering with reverence and appreciation those who have given their lives for our country. I also thank all those actively serving now and those that had served, along with our police force, firemen, EMTs and all those who tend to us and keep us safe. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. God bless you all, and please know you are prayed for and truly appreciated.

Now, this week’s musings …

As I drive to my job assignments, I feel like one of those old retired farmers, gawking out the window at all of the activity going on. Everything is brimming with motion and color. Oats are making their presence known, and fields are being prepped to receive the seed, either soybean or corn.

Fri
24
May

34 years of columns run the gamut on topics

On May 28, it will be 34 years since my first column appeared in what was then The Shawano Evening Leader. A lot more than the name of the paper has changed since that time.

The first column on May 28, 1985, was about a teacher in Tigerton. He still lives in the area, but other than subbing, he is now retired. He was, and still is, affectionately known as Mr. B.

“I believe the children’s grades are my grades, and I don’t ever want to be a C teacher,” he noted in that column.

Another was on the Tigerton Community Folk Choir, which was made up of several Tigerton area people of all ages. I was part of it at one time. In the beginning, we just met and practiced. Eventually, we were asked to perform at events, and I recall performing at the Shawano Folk Music Festival one year.

Fri
24
May

Ferret event dedicated to late Clintonville resident


Contributed Photo Amy Steenbock, of Clintonville, cuddles her late father’s prize-winning ferret Whynot during the Ferret Fiesta on May 18 in West Bend.

The 2019 Ferret Fiesta, a state ferret show held May 18 in West Bend, was dedicated to the late Leon (Corky) Steenbock, of Clintonville.

Steenbock, who passed away in January, was an active member of the group. He and his daughter, Amy, both showed ferrets and entered them in the show annually. Steenbock and his ferret, Wesley, won first place two years ago.

This year, a ferret Corky Steenbock adopted from a rescue named Whynot won the first place trophy for kits (young ferrets). Amy Steenbock showed the ferret, and she and her brother, Gregg, accepted the dedication plaque at the opening of the all-day show.

Doris Steenbock, Corky’s wife and Amy’s mother, also loved the pets and had her own ferret. While Doris lived in a nursing home before her death two years ago, the ferrets were popular visitors with patients and staff.

A number of Clintonville residents and relatives were present for the dedication.

Fri
24
May

Farmers market starts again in June

The Shawano Farmers Market will open for the summer 2019 season June 15.

The market will be held again this year at Franklin Park, 230 S. Washington St., Shawano. The open-air market will be open Saturdays from 8 a.m. until noon until Oct. 5. Vendors will be spread out throughout the park.

Products sold include fruits, vegetables, flowers, landscaping plants, maple syrup, bread, fish, meats and select high-quality crafts. Local musicians perform, and master gardeners are available to answer gardening questions. Family friendly activities are also available during select market days.

New this year, the seedlings program gives potential vendors the chance to set up and sell their products at the Shawano Farmers Market for one Saturday free of charge.

Fri
24
May

Annual paddle and pedal event set for June 22

The fourth annual Wolf River Paddle & Pedal event will be held June 22 at Judd Park, 1013 S. Water St., Shawano.

Canoes and kayaks will launch from Judd Park at the Lieg Avenue boat landing in Shawano at 9:15 a.m. and travel down flat Wolf River water through natural areas. The paddle portion takes about 2-2½ hours, ending at the County Road CCC boat landing.

Boats will be transported back to Judd Park while participants embark on well-marked 8, 12 or 22 mile bike routes. Maps will be provided.

The cost is $15 per person ($10 for Shawano Pathways members and/or those renting equipment from Great Wolf Tubing).

Registration fee covers the cost of shuttling boats back to Shawano, bike and boat security, emergency vehicle, water, maps and snacks. Revenue from the Shawano Pathways fundraiser will support new and improved biking and walking trails.

Fri
24
May

Writing a lifelong hobby as well as good therapy

Some people read a book to relax. Others exercise, and there are those who get a massage. How do you relax? For me, if I am feeling stressed or anxious, my therapy of choice is to write.

Sometimes I just write random thoughts. I have written a few books — one children’s book and one about a homeless man who experiences the best and worst in people. I don’t plan on sharing these books with anyone. They probably aren’t that good, but writing them was both fun and relaxing.

It was my English teacher/forensics coach, Lillian Abrahamson, who first encouraged me to write. She suggested I write and deliver four-minute speeches. The first one I wrote and presented was about discrimination. I won a first in state competition. That was quite a confidence builder, and I have dabbled in writing ever since.

Fri
24
May

Old World crafting and camaraderie go hand in hand

Antiques stores often attract people who are curious and passionate about the way things were.

Diane Hartleben, manager of the District No. 3 Antiques store in Wittenberg, often schedules events to demonstrate Old World techniques for those people.

“The people who come to these events like to share and to learn, so there is always something new to talk about,” Hartleben said.

On April 6, she invited crafters to demonstrate needle felting, spinning and using a circular sock machine.

Hartleben demonstrated how to comb out the fiber to make roving, which is a long narrow bundle of fiber to be used for spinning into yarn. The fiber came from Darlene Nueske’s Applewood Lane Alpaca Farm south of Wittenberg.

The fiber had been washed, and Hartleben showed different techniques to comb or card the fibers. The process is necessary to help remove any residual hay and to straighten the fibers for spinning.

Fri
24
May

A parting gift to the area she loved


Leader Photo by Miriam Nelson The alpacas on the side door of the Wittenberg Family Barbershop, 512 S. Webb St., offer a preview of the other panels that will be revealed at 2:30 p.m. Saturday. The door was painted by Alicia Rheal, mural project coordinator.

The plan had been to celebrate her 90th birthday May 25 with the unveiling of a mural honoring “What We Do” in Wittenberg.

Sadly, Lois Smith, the founder of Walls of Wittenberg, passed away before seeing her vision come to fruition.

WOW will carry on with Smith’s wishes by unveiling the mural at 2:30 p.m. Saturday and holding a birthday party at 3 p.m. at the WOWSPACE, 114 Vinal St. The public is invited.

The idea for the mural came when Smith brought one of her grandsons to the Wittenberg Family Barbershop and charged owner Jim Siebert with transforming him.

“He had long hair and a full beard,” Siebert said of his customer, “and he went out looking pretty slick.”

According to Siebert, Smith felt there was artistry in his work as a barber. About a year later, she approached him about having the “What We Do” mural painted on the side of his building at 512 S. Webb St.

Wed
22
May

Top auto exhibitors cruise to victory at Clintonville car show


Photo by Grace Kirchner Kirk Hoffman, of Marion, displays his 1929 Chevrolet four-door sedan at the Spring Cruise Car Show on May 17. The car was painted to match its original green color.

The 17th annual Spring Cruise Car Show was another success as Clintonville’s Main Street was lined with beautiful vehicles May 17.

First-place and runner-up trophies were presented in 15 categories, along with other special awards.

This year, the family of Steve Norder sponsored the trophies in his memory. Norder was an avid car enthusiast and one of the founding members of the Spring Cruise Car Show committee. He passed away from cancer Aug. 11, 2017.

A special trophy was presented in his name to Bill and Kathy Klassen, of Greenville, for their red and white Chevrolet Bel-Air 1955 entry.

The Mayor’s Choice trophy was given to Kirk and Julie Hoffman, Marion, for their green 1929 four-door Chevrolet.

The Chamber of Commerce Ladies Choice trophy went to Al Cummings, Appleton, for his 1970 F-250 maroon Ford.

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