Community

Wed
18
Jul

DNR needs volunteers for Snapshot Day

The Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance and Wisconsin DNR are looking for volunteers to help search for non-native plants and animals that could potentially threaten area rivers and lakes. Snapshot Day is a free, one-day opportunity to learn about identifying and preventing invasive species in our waterways.

Families and individuals who want to help make a difference in the environment are encouraged to attend the event, which will be held Aug. 18 from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Shawano County Park Pavilion. For information, call Brady Stockwell at 920-851-4336, email Brady@fwwa.org or visit www.wisconsinrivers.org/snapshot-day.

Wed
18
Jul

Community gardens in full bloom


Leader Photo by Kelly Hogan Deb Jacobson, Zion Lutheran Church’s community garden committee chairman, picks weeds from her garden, where she grows potatoes, brussel sprots, herbs and more.

At the peak of summer, the crops growing in Shawano’s community gardens can be found at full flourish.

Shawano residents who may not have the space, soil or gardening know-how have the opportunity to foster their green thumbs through community gardening programs, such as the one adjacent to Zion Lutheran Church or the one administered through the city, with plots located off of West Lieg Avenue and Water Street.

All community members are welcome to participate; 10-by-10 foot plots are available at Zion Lutheran Church for $8 and various plot sizes, including raised beds, are available at the city’s community garden for $10.

“Community gardens provide an inexpensive option, including infrastructure, for those who want to garden but may not be able to for reasons such as lack of room or infertile soil,” said Matt Hendricks, Shawano park and recreation director .

Sat
14
Jul

Aunt Gertie still parties on at 104

She was born on the day that Babe Ruth left the Baltimore Orioles to join the Boston Red Sox, July 10, 1914. The day was a Friday, and I am not sure how much of an impact the baseball trade meant to people in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but I do know the impact that little girl made in my life, and continues to make on all who know her.

As a teenager, she was a bridesmaid for my parents’ wedding. Twenty-five years later, she took pictures at my parents’ 25th wedding anniversary. She had a camera that took slides that could be viewed in a viewfinder. The colors remained vibrant.

When she would come to the farm near Clintonville where I grew up, she always had a camera with her. I look at those black-and-white pictures now, and see my brother and I, posed outside the house. Sometimes the whole family would be part of the pictures.

Sat
14
Jul

Back-Forty Mushrooms and Forage


Contributed photo Pauline and Dan Johnson, of Tigerton, are growing mushrooms as a way to ease into retirement.

Some people have no idea what they plan to do with their retirement years. Others, like Dan and Pauline Johnson, of Tigerton, find a hobby that turns into a full-time business.

About 3 1/2 years ago, a neighbor approached the Johnsons about growing mushrooms. The neighbor was growing microgreens for a few restaurants in the Milwaukee area and splitting time between the two areas.

Although it certainly wasn’t something Dan Johnson had thought about, he found the idea intriguing.

“I’m getting older. And one day, I’m going to retire, and I’m going to want something to do,” said Johnson, who is the building and grounds supervisor for the Wittenberg-Birnamwood School District.

When he thought about mushrooms, he reasoned they’re light to carry, he said.

Johnson is not a gardener at heart, so he decided to read a lot of books. He did research for several months, he said, trying to figure out what to grow and how to do it.

Sat
14
Jul

Diabetes program goes beyond weight loss

Deep down, many people know they should be more active, cut down on junk food or simply start believing in themselves more.

When a person’s health is threatened with the onset of Type 2 diabetes, the factors that contribute to this potential diagnosis go beyond a number on the scale; they reach into people’s physical, mental and emotional lives in complex and meaningful ways.

The PT2 group, or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes, a program of ThedaCare At Work in Shawano, has been racking up success stories as participants embark on long-term lifestyle changes to avoid the onset of diabetes. At the same time, they support one another and ultimately come to see themselves as capable, active people in charge of their own well-being.

Sat
14
Jul

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Members of the new Tri-County 4-H Club met recently at St. Casimir’s Church in Krakow. Members include, from left, front row, Sarah Sumner, Evelyn Mihalski, Gwen Sumner and Olivia Balthazor; second row, Robert Sumner, Traci Sumner and Jennifer Balthazor; back row, Katelyn Mihalski, Garrett Mihalski, Danielle Mihalski, Gracie Mihalski and Kaelyn Sumner holding Lorelei Sumner. Not pictured are Drew Mihalski, Dave Balthazor, Carter Scray, Spencer Scray, and Melissa Ebert.

The Tri-County 4-H Club was formed in November 2017, taking that name because the members are from Shawano, Oconto and Brown counties. The members were in a larger club but wanted to have meetings closer to home and keep their meetings easier for the members.

“We had newer families,” said Traci Sumner, who is co-leader with Carrie Mihalski and Nora Scray.

The kids range in age from the young Cloverbuds to those 18-year-olds who are in their last year of 4-H. Their projects are beef, swine, sheep, aerospace, visual arts, cake decorating and cooking.

Currently, four families make up the group.

“We’re hoping to pick up more kids,” Sumner said.

The kids have to select their projects in January and they have until Aug. 1 to decide which ones they will enter into the Shawano County Fair.

The club always has a project for each meeting, and it could be just helping the members work on their record books.

Sat
14
Jul

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Tracie Brede has been involved in 4-H all her life.

Tracie Brede has been involved in 4-H all her life.

Brede is a Bonduel native, graduating from Bonduel High School. She earned an associate degree in business administration from Northeast Wisconsin Technical College. She worked part time at Bonduel State Bank while in school and then full time in 2000, where she is a teller, proof operator, and does various other jobs.

Brede lives in the town of Lessor with her daughter, Trinity, and significant other, Aaron Moeller. She was raised on the farm of her parents, Dan and Judi Brede, and still helps them out along with helping Moeller on his dairy and beef farm.

Where do you volunteer?

“I’m the chair of the Shawano County Livestock Committee, Shawano County Leaders Inc. president, Landstad 4-H Club general leader, and Bonduel High School trapshooting assistant coach. I‘ve been doing 4-H since I was little in the Cecil Golden Wheels 4-H Club.”

What do you do for the 4-H organizations?

Sat
14
Jul

Obesity has an impact on elective surgeries

Nearly three-fourths of American adults are either overweight or obese, according to recently released figures by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Increasingly, hospitals are saying “no” to performing elective surgeries on very obese patients.

A person’s weight range is determined by his or her body mass index, or BMI. An individual with a BMI of 25 to 29.9 is classified as overweight, and someone with a BMI of 30 or higher is considered to be obese. About 69 percent of adults in the United States are overweight — 36 percent of which are obese.

Obesity is a major contributing factor to many health issues — diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, back and joint problems, said Krista Solarek, physician assistant at ThedaCare Orthopedic Care in Berlin.

Sat
14
Jul

Two native plays to be featured in area

College of Menominee Nation and the Oneida Community Education Center continue to produce Native American theater in Northeastern Wisconsin.

The process begins through playwriting workshops, then a script editing process, casting and rehearsals, and finally a full production that travels to Native American communities throughout Wisconsin. This is their third summer producing touring theater as the Wisconsin Native American Playwright Festival.

This year the plays will take place from July 24-27 in four Native American communities:

• July 24, 7 p.m. at the Oneida Community Education Center, 2632 S. Packerland Drive, Green Bay.

• July 25, 7 p.m. at the College of Menominee Nation, N172 Highway 47-55, Keshena.

• July 26, 7 p.m. at the Mohican Family Center, N8605 Oak St., Bowler.

• July 27, 7 p.m. at the Siga Funmaker Community Center, W17634 Radke Road, Wittenberg.

Sat
14
Jul

Krolows teachers by day, singers by night


Contributed Photo Julie and Dan Krolow are working on two new CDs; one will have 12 country songs and the other 12 gospel songs.

NEW Media recently chatted with Dan Krolow. He and his wife, Julie, live in Wittenberg. Dan teaches in the Wittenberg-Birnamwood School District, and Julie teaches in the Rosholt district. They released their first CD, “Songs of Sorrow, Songs of Hope,” in 2016 and are back in the studio doing two more albums.

You described your first CD as a collection of songs you had written to help you deal with happy and uncomfortable times in your lives. What happened with that CD?

“We sold that at our church and through local stores and basically word of mouth. Everyone has been so supportive of it within the community. Songs from that CD have been streamed all over the world and listened to nearly 2 million times now.”

Was the money used for something special?

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