Community

Sat
17
Nov

Church basement women are more like second family


Photo by Leah Lehman Standing with the flowers, which are gifts for those with November birthdays at Homme Home, are Carol Lehman, Elaine Erickson and Betty Kohn. Kohn purchased the gifts.

In the 1970s, I was invited to come to Ladies Aid at my church. At that time, I had two children in school and two toddlers at home. I told the lady who called that I’d have to bring my children with me, and she answered with, “That’s OK. We like children.”

Well, my toddlers were well-behaved when I took them places — they were normal toddlers at home — so it all worked out. Somehow, I joined the Ladies Aid and never realized what that meant.

While we were called Ladies Aid, in the 1990s I learned that I really was a Lutheran church basement woman. It was about that time that I learned about a book by that name and, more recently, there was a play in the Midwest titled “Lutheran Church Basement Women,” which was hilarious. I saw it twice, both times in the Minneapolis area.

Sat
17
Nov

Neglecting friendship results in hurt, loneliness

As I grew up, my dad often gave me words of advice. I remember him saying, “Lorna, always remember, you are no better than anyone else, and no one else is better than you.” He also said, “When you know you’re right, stand up and defend your position, even if you stand alone, but when you’re wrong, be a big enough person to admit it.”

Dad also advised me, “Lorna, live your life so that, when you look in a mirror, you like the person looking back at you.” I must admit, recently I have really disappointed myself. I feel ashamed and do not like the person I see in my mirror.

During my tenure as mayor, I met many wonderful people. One of those people is a lovely lady who I would talk with at various meetings and events. She kindly invited me to be her guest at a few community events. We developed a mutual friendship.

Fri
16
Nov

Goodfellows seek donations for holidays

As part of a 68-year history of assisting those in need, the Clintonville Goodfellows are again seeking donations to make the holiday season brighter for all.

The charitable group founded by Frank Sinkewicz, a former officer of FWD Corporation, has been distributing food, toys and other items to needy individuals for decades. Volunteers are collecting names of potential recipients in the Clintonville and Marion school districts, who will be contacted by a member of Goodfellows to verify the applications.

At the same time, the Goodfellows are seeking donations of money, food, toys, canned goods, mittens, caps, blankets, comforters and other necessary items from churches, civic organizations, individuals and businesses. It requires countless hours of volunteerism by area residents to make this annual program a success.

Fri
16
Nov

Tribal clinic offers high-tech ultrasounds


Contributed Photo Hether Schmid, a registered sonographer with Menominee Tribal Clinic, shows off the cutting-edge Siemens Sequoia, which the tribal clinic purchased recently.

Each year, hundreds of patients of the Menominee Tribal Clinic had been sent to outside facilities for diagnostic ultrasound exams. Starting earlier this month, in partnership with ThedaCare, the clinic has been able to offer a broad range of ultrasound procedures on site, according to Jerry Waukau, tribal clinic administrator.

Waukau said that through the clinic’s imaging connections with ThedaCare, images taken at the clinic can be sent electronically to specialists. Thus the clinic can now offer a range of services, including obstetric, abdominal, pelvic, thyroid, scrotal, kidney, vascular and other scans. Echocardiograms and plans for some needle-guided procedures are also in the works.

Wed
14
Nov

Navy vet speaks of ‘pride across the nation’


Photo by Grace Kirchner Clintonville Mayor Richard Beggs, right, a Navy veteran, introduces James Vissers, a Navy veteran from Appleton, at Clintonville’s Veterans Day ceremony. Vissers told the veterans that they would not be forgotten as he thanked them for their service and encouraged others to thank our servicemen and women,

Clintonville Mayor Richard Beggs, master of ceremonies at this year’s Veterans Day memorial service, reminded those in attendance that World War I ended 100 years ago Sunday. Though it was chilly for the ceremony and the grounds at the Veterans Memorial on South Main Street were covered in snow, “our veterans endured much worse than this,” Beggs said.

One such veteran is James Vissers of Appleton, who served in the Navy and was Sunday’s guest speaker.

“Today we gather to honor and pay gratitude to those who serve our country,” Vissers said. “There is pride across the nation for those who made the sacrifice.”

He impressed upon the audience the importance of showing gratitude to those who have served.

Sat
10
Nov

Farming, a roller coaster ride

This has been a challenging, roller coaster-ride-type year for farmers. From weather extremes to unstable milk prices, farming is not for the faint of heart. My dear dad unceasingly prayed for strength, wisdom and protection for the “tillers of the land.” That prayer is needed more than ever in the times we are living.

Milk prices forever fluctuate, and although we are not in the trenches any longer, we still feel for the agricultural community, especially those family-owned dairies who are disappearing from our glorious state with alarming frequency. Checking the latest market price, who can make a living on $15.52/per hundredweight milk prices with 70 to 80 cows? It’s either go big or go home.

Sat
10
Nov

Plenty of goods and services at Esker’s Town & Country


Leader Photo by Miriam Nelson Terry Esker, owner of Esker’s Town & Country Hardware store in Wittenberg, stands next to the mural on the south side of his building. “Help is on the Way” by Alicia Rheal was painted in 2008 and features firefighters and EMTs past and present.

When you work at a profession for 40 years, it’s usually because you enjoy it. This holds true for Terry Esker, owner of Esker’s Town and Country, a hardware store in downtown Wittenberg.

Esker worked in construction, building and repairing homes, and he was a frequent customer of the hardware store in Hatley.

“I was 24, and I used to go in there for plumbing and electrical supplies, and one day the owner asked if I wanted to be his partner,” Esker said.

Esker was at the right place at the right time. Phil Thorpe and his brother-in-law Dan Pohl had moved to the area from Milwaukee to run the hardware store in Hatley, but the brother-in-law didn’t like the service work.

Sat
10
Nov

Veteran brother remembered with pride

This past weekend, my sister-in-law Rozanne Robenhagen told me that their family headstone was placed on the gravesite last week. My brother Pat passed away in June. Rozanne said, “I selected a simple stone because we lived a simple life. I think Pat would approve.”

I agree. My brother was a quiet, humble, Christian man. My brother was a veteran. He served in the United States Navy. He served as a hospital corpsman/medical specialist, both with sailors and Marines alike. His military service took him to the Pacific Islands and Japan.

I remember going to my room and crying when he left for the service. He was such a great guy, never saying an unkind word about anyone. He was selected prom king by the student body. He was a great baseball and basketball player. I sure was going to miss him, the big brother who made me so proud.

Sat
10
Nov

Time and love are key ingredients in tasty soup

When the cool, damp fall weather comes upon us, I think of soup. I have been thinking about making my favorite soup for quite some time, but wondered what day I’d be home long enough to actually let it simmer to completion.

When I eat out, I always see what kind of soup they are having and order accordingly. Of course, for my diet’s sake, I try to get one with lots of vegetables. Lentil, bean and pea are on the top of the list, but aren’t found very often.

The first time I had lentil soup was in San Jose, California. I ordered it because I was at a fancy hotel restaurant, and it was one of few things that I could afford. Even though I had no idea what a lentil was, the soup was great.

I spent my life as a farm wife and mother making three hardy meals a day, some of which included soup. Chili was a favorite, and yes, it did have noodles. One kid didn’t like kidney beans, so he took his portion first, and then I added the beans.

Fri
09
Nov

Sauerkraut juice benefitting farmers


Photo by Grace Kirchner GLK Foods has a supply of sauerkraut juice that they are offering to farmers free of charge. Many say they see an increase in their cow production that comes on gradually. GLK Foods is the largest producer of sauerkraut in the world.

Some dairymen in the area have found a way to increase milk production and reduce their costs by adding sauerkraut juice, or SKJ, to their dairy ration.

This comes at a time when low milk prices have caused some challenging times for farmers as they look for ways to cut their costs while increasing efficiency. The idea is new to the area but something that is being done in Germany. The juice is available free from GLK Foods in Bear Creek, 400 Clark St., for the hauling.

According to university studies at Leipzig University in Germany, SKJ has vitamins, enzymes and minerals that improve feed digestion and animal health, help increase milk production and improve reproduction.

“Lactobaccilus plantarum is the microbe that is natural in cabbage and is preserving cabbage while creating positive enzymes that are also immunity boosters,” said Michael Maney, GLK Foods director of technical services, Bear Creek.

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