Opinions

Sat
28
Apr

Snowed-in resident grateful for neighbors

You have been hearing a lot of bad things in the news these days, but I wanted to tell you of something really positive. Something that makes me feel very blessed to be living in Shawano. From Friday, April 13, to Monday, we’ve had a nasty snowstorm that has piled huge drifts against our doors and our driveway. Our snowblower is not strong enough to handle this amount of heavy, wet snow all at once. Since I have old injuries to my lower back, it is very difficult for me to do as much at any one time, though I do try to push myself sometimes unwisely.

Sat
28
Apr

Student performers don’t disappoint

Editor:

Live theater is alive and well in Clintonville!

This weekend, I attended two great productions by school-age kids: the St. Martin and home-school shows.

Audiences at both musical shows included not only parents and grandparents, but many community supporters of the arts. They were not disappointed. Talented kids were molded by teachers and parents into polished performers. As a dancer, I was particularly impressed with the choreography executed by the large casts.

The St. Martin show included all seventh- and eighth-grade students in speaking parts, and fifth- and sixth-graders in the chorus. All were costumed in World War II-era garb. The home-school show featured a cast of 35 with actors from high school to what appeared to be kindergarten or less.

Sat
28
Apr

Lightening the load

Every good farmer has a love for their animals and their land. My dad, who went to be with the Lord nine years ago this month, loved his generational farm. Having much compassion for the farmer, he would always humbly ask God to bless “the tillers of the land.” Toward the last years of his life, he was unable to help my brother yet his heart was always out there on the farm.

After “retiring” from the farm, Mom and Dad moved to Marion to their little house in town. As they aged, they became more and more dependent on us four kids. My older sister accepted a good hunk of the responsibility, as she had no children of her own and lived close by. Before she’d leave, Dad would tell her, “Thanks for lightening the load.”

Sat
28
Apr

Turn in unused prescription drugs this Saturday

In 2017, the State of Wisconsin lost 827 people to the opioid epidemic. Last year, over 64,000 Americans died from a drug overdose. In Wisconsin, local, state and county officials are also combating methamphetamine, heroin and other substance abuse deaths. Each person who died was someone’s mother or father, son or daughter, brother or sister. Many of these mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters were also part of rural America.

Today, in the midst of this nationwide epidemic, small towns and rural places from across America have been particularly impacted by opioid misuse. Opioids are highly effective painkillers with legitimate medical uses but they are also highly addictive by becoming a gateway to substance abuse, with users often transitioning from prescription medications to deadly drugs such as heroin.

Thu
26
Apr

The day Grape Nuts rolled up to the farm

Can you imagine two New York producers driving down Highway 29 from Green Bay to check out a farm in Bonduel, Wisconsin, for a TV commercial? They spotted our farm up high on Dehn’s hill and turned off onto our little country road, up our steep hill and turned into our driveway. They got out and asked us how we would feel about “a gang” taking over the place.

Then they left to check out the place that had been recommended to them, but they came back and chose our farm overlooking miles of rolling hills and farmland toward Green Bay. From our hill, we could see the lights of Austin Straubel Airport at night, more than 30 miles away.

They came with a crew — two producers, camera crew and a filming coordinator. A Green Bay family had auditioned and had been selected to be the cast in the commercial.

Sat
21
Apr

Community lends helping hand — even when it’s buried in snow

Daunting challenges bring out the best in people. Whether hard pressed by serious health problems, confronted by a life or death crisis, saddened by the loss of a loved one or overwhelmed by the brute forces of Mother Nature’s wrath, the true sense of community shines brightest when we most need it.

Shawano County’s true sense of community has been at its zenith since a winter storm dropped about 30 inches of snow April 13-15, bringing life to a standstill.

Treacherous travel conditions, coupled with record setting snowfalls, pushed our region to its limits, shutting down most governmental entities, schools, churches, restaurants and retail stores. Through it all, our sense of community prevailed to ensure we all survived to talk about this harrowing experience.

Sat
21
Apr

You never saw Grandma without her apron


Contributed Photo Lorna Marquardt’s grandmother, Martha Robenhagen, wears an apron while hanging up clothes in the 1950s. Marquardt shared lots of “clothesline conversations” with her under those clotheslines.

Like many of you, staying in the house for days because of the blizzard had me a little stir crazy. I decided to spend a little time cleaning, not my favorite thing to do.

When my hubby was in high school, he made a beautiful cedar chest in wood shop. As I dusted off the lovely chest, I realized it had been a very long time since I peeked inside. I knew it contained several old quilts. What I didn’t know was it also contained a few surprises. Tucked inside the quilts were a few boxes. To my delight, in one of the boxes was a handmade blue checkered gingham apron from my husband’s grandma, Anna Raddant. It was a wedding shower gift and the card was still inside the box.

Grandma Raddant passed away shortly after we married, but the apron rekindled many memories, including those of my grandma Martha Robenhagen.

Sat
21
Apr

Group forming to address gun violence

To the editor:

Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is a nationwide organization founded by a mother after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elmenetary School in Connecticut. It is a non-partisan grassroots movement with over 5 million supporters seeking common sense solutions to address our country’s culture of gun violence while respecting the Second Amendment.

Statistics show that an average of 93 Americans a day die from gun violence. Evey 36 hours, a child goes to the emergency room with a gun-related injury.

Moms Demand Action lays out four goals to address gun safety in America, including closing loopholes in our background check system; supporting reasonable limits on where, when and how loaded guns are carried and used in public; promoting gun safety and mobilizing popular support for policies that respect the Second Amendment; and protect people.

Sat
21
Apr

County government needs to be leaner

To the editor:

The 27 members of the Shawano County Board of Supervisors are starting their new term. To begin, that means deciding the membership of 38 county committees. That seems to be a whole lot of government for a small, rural county.

In many other states, the county government is far leaner, streamlined and much more efficient in service delivery. Those states average five elected supervisors for each county. Those supervisors can meet at a conference table and look at each other as they study and deliberate their business. They are not required to address the chaiperson and are free to speak directly to one another.

The topic of what time to hold their meetings is bound to arise. That might present an opportunity to begin studying other significant reforms that would benefit the people of Shawano County.

Tom Anderson,

Shawano

Sat
21
Apr

April ‘showers’ lead to blizzard of the century

Normally, when we think of April showers, we have visions of rain bringing forth May flowers. That seems not to be the case in 2018. I happened to see a weather report on Friday the 13th that suggested some areas would be harder hit than others, and it would be the areas with thunder-snow. So, when I began to see lightning — and hear the crashing of thunder later that evening — I had an uneasy feeling.

Soon there seemed to be some sleet and, eventually, a whiteout of snow. When I woke on Saturday morning, the whipping wind was blowing around more snow, and I was hearing that Tigerton had 14 inches of snow with more to come. I thought about all the times these huge storms were forecasted but didn’t materialize, so I had my doubts.

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