Opinions

Sat
17
Feb

Learning a new routine to manage diabetes

When I saw my health provider early in January, I didn’t know how my life would change. It was nothing that she said; in fact, my A1C test came back stable, meaning it was the same as the last check. Great news, right. For non-diabetics, that test indicates the average blood glucose level in your blood for the past three months.

However, for the past couple of years, I felt I have had to eat more than I want, just to keep my blood sugar in a safe range. So, I innocently asked to be referred to a diabetic educator. I wanted to be more than stable, I wanted it to be better.

My visit with the educator was Jan. 23, and that was an eye opener, and a game changer for me. I have had to learn a new routine, even though I am somewhat still missing the old routine, I am forging ahead as best I can, and the amount of insulin I take has been reduced twice.

Sat
10
Feb

Humane society prepares for big fundraiser

I love February. It is the month we celebrate our wedding anniversary, my birthday and the birthday of our great-grandson Brody. It is also the month of the Shawano County Humane Society’s annual banquet.

The fundraising banquet will be held on Feb. 17. The cost is $35 per person if registered by Wednesday. Late registration fee is $40. The social hour begins at 5:30 p.m.; a perfect time to visit and buy tickets for the raffles and games. The tenderloin tips and broasted chicken dinner will be served at 7 p.m.

Society board member Carolyn Zuhse commented: “It is our main fundraiser for the year. I remember back in the late ’90s, we had a theme for each year’s banquet. When we started building the present shelter, the theme was, ‘We Have Only Just Begun.’ We have the event at The Gathering every year. They are always so accommodating and welcoming.”

Fri
09
Feb

A time for springing into spring

This seems to be the time of year that most people are getting sick of the cold, snow and sometimes ice that seem to be part of what we call winter. Groundhog Day has passed, and it seems he saw his shadow. So, six more weeks of winter. Well, I have news for fans of his prediction: We will have six-plus more weeks of winter, no matter what he saw.

The calendar might say spring begins on March 20, so that in itself says six more weeks. How severe depends on the year. However, residents of Wisconsin know that the end of March, and even into April, can be very fickle in its weather fronts.

I, too, admit I am getting sick of the winter and look forward to springing into spring.

February does bring Valentine’s Day for all those lovers out there — or at least those who like chocolate, which will be on sale on the 15th. There will also be a President’s Day, and this year Ash Wednesday will be on Valentine’s Day.

Sat
03
Feb

Husband provides constant reminders of love

A mayor is often asked to issue a proclamation. The city has a book with examples of proclamations for most occasions. I often chose to write my own. I felt if I was going to sign my name to it, and it was going to be stamped with the official seal of the city, I wanted to be the author.

While in office I sometimes wrote personal proclamations upon request. In fact, I wrote one that I gave to my hubby several years ago on our wedding anniversary. It is framed and displayed in our home, a reminder of how God has blessed our marriage. It says:

WHEREAS, we met, fell in love, and on Feb. 1, 1964 we married, and

WHEREAS, on Nov. 19, 1964 we were blessed with our first born, a beautiful daughter we named Amy; and

WHEREAS, on March 12, 1969 we were blessed once more, this time with the birth of our loving son Daniel; and

WHEREAS, our lives have been enriched with three wonderful grandchildren, Jeffrey, Morgan and Mason; and

Sat
03
Feb

Women’s March, right-to-lifers should walk together

To the editor:

Sunday, Jan. 21, the Menominee/Shawano Chapter of Wisconsin Right to Life commemorated the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion by marching to the county courthouse steps.

I read in the Leader that the community Women’s March did the same thing the day before to protest in part the lack of various rights for women.

Our march was for the same thing. In the United States, more than 500,000 unborn girls are denied the right to life each year. They are killed by abortion.

Next year, we should join forces and walk together. The right to life for unborn girls.

Michael Richter,

Menominee/Shawano Chapter,

Wisconsin Right to Life

Thu
01
Feb

The isolation of antiquities

I have a collection of antiques from Green Hall Pottery. It is proudly displayed in an open cupboard in my living room. It is not used anymore except to hold coins for bingo. Just like we, here in assisted living, are a collection of die-hards displayed proudly by family.

We’re lucky if we’ve maintained some clout from our jobs. Some folks lose their identities when they retire. They have difficulty adjusting to a new existence. Hobbies such as painting, crafts or writing can replace all that and give you years of enjoyment.

Sat
27
Jan

Ole and Lena tales always keep sides splitting

I love the word “laughter” and its synonyms — chuckling, chortling, guffawing, giggling, tittering, cackling and snickering. Laughter is said to be the most contagious of all emotional experiences.

Laughing is good for our health. It stretches muscles, burns calories, triggers the release of our body’s natural painkillers, enhances oxygen intake, boosts our immune system and improves blood pressure.

I can remember laughing out loud at some of the shows that were on television years ago. A few of my favorites were “I Love Lucy,” “The Honeymooners,” “All in the Family,” “Red Skelton,” “The Carol Burnett Show” and “The Bob Newhart Show.” Today’s so-called comedy shows rarely make me laugh. I wonder if it is a generational thing, or maybe they just aren’t funny. I’m not sure.

Sat
27
Jan

Wisconsin deals with a natural shutdown

There have been a few shutdowns of late. The one in DC didn’t last too long, but of course, the final solution was only put off until Feb. 8. Hopefully, they can come to some agreement by that time.

On Monday, most traffic was shut down in our area, with the rain, sleet, snow and slop that fell in our area. I know I did not venture out. It wasn’t quite like the blizzards of old used to be, but was sort of close. When all was done, the cleanup was a challenge. Mine didn’t happen until Tuesday, when my grandson came and plowed the driveway, and around the mailbox.

If it had only been the driveway, I wouldn’t have needed it, because the snow wasn’t that deep, and it provided traction on the ice. However, the end of the driveway was piled with clumps, and the mailbox was surrounded by the same.

Sat
27
Jan

Homme participating in tablet engagement

To the editor:

Homme Home for the Aging is excited to announce our involvement in a new initiative. Starting this year, Homme Home will take part in the Music and Memory Tablet Engagement program through funding by the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region.

For the past several years, Homme has been proud to provide individualized music to our residents living with dementia through Music and Memory. Through the tablet engagement program, our staff will receive specialized training in the use of an iPad for engagement sessions with our residents. The world of music, visual arts and learning will be opened to our residents in a new way.

Funding for this initiative was generously provided through a grant from the Bright Idea Fund within the Community Foundation for the Fox Valley Region.

Devin Minor

Activity Director

Homme Home of Wittenberg

Fri
26
Jan

THE BITTERSWEET TALE OF CHOCOLATE


Leader Photo by Greg Mellis Mexican chocolate cake is a unique way you can give your sweetheart chocolate this Valentine’s Day.

While doing the research for these columns, I am struck by how frequently my search leads me to Central America and Mexico to find the origins of so many foods. Tracing the roots of chocolate follows the same trail.

It is widely believed that the Olemec people, an ancient farming culture from the tabasco region of Mexico were the first to process and consume cacao beans. The widespread use of the bitter bean, however, really began with their descendents, the Mayans and Aztecs. University of Pennsylvania anthropologists discovered cacao residue on Aztec pottery dating back to 1400 BC.

Initially, it was the sweet, fleshy fruit around the bean that was fermented into an alcoholic beverage and used by Aztec holy men for religious rituals. Later, it became a bitter drink made from the roasted beans that were boiled into a thick frothy consistency and flavored with spices and chili peppers. This is still a popular drink in Southern Mexico called Chilate.

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