Opinions

Sat
05
May

Highway department kept roads clear

To the editor:

Our recent historic 33-inch snowstorm was one that I’ll not soon forget.

Those of us in Menominee County should be, and are, very appreciative of the efforts put forth by our highway department in keeping our roads open.

While the snow on my driveway prevented me from getting to the road, it was very reassuring that, had I been able to, I could have driven someplace.

Thank you for your hard work.

Steve Zaleski,

Keshena

Sat
05
May

Thanks for all the help during snowstorm

To the editor:

To all the snow plowers in the county and city and law officers, you did a great job on keeping our roads clear of snow and ice during the big snowstorm, risking their lives to help all the citizens of the county and city be safe.

I think the snow plowers did a great, great job for 24 hours a day. I thank you all.

Then neighbors helped neighbors get shoveled out. I had four different people who helped me to get plowed out and shoveled out, so thank you for helping me.

Duaine Gast,

Shawano

Sat
05
May

Gun killings perpetrated by people

To the editor:

I was going for a ride, and I was talking about all the gun killings. I was reminded, it’s not the guns, but the people who have the guns. It’s the people that are the killers, and they are using the guns to do it — and I might say, the wrong way.

Just remember the soldiers and the police officers. These people know what they are doing and when to use them. It’s sad that guns get in the wrong hands and people don’t use them correctly.

Please stop and think about others and not yourself. Something’s got to be done about our laws.

Sally Raddant,

Shawano

Sat
05
May

Older generation embraces change, even if you don’t see it

King Whitney Jr. said, “Change has a considerable psychological impact on the human mind. To the fearful it is threatening because it means that things may get worse. To the hopeful, it is encouraging because things may get better. To the confident it is inspiring because the challenge exists to make things better.”

I recently overheard some individuals comment that older people are set in their ways and are negative toward change. I doubt if the younger generation really understands the changes that older people have gone through and embraced over the years.

For example, folks of my generation have gone from a wall phone with a party line to cellphones/smart phones. When you are out and about, take a notice of how many older people are using them. It’s surprising.

Sat
28
Apr

Husband remembers community life in the 1950s

My hubby, Don, the son of Clarence and Irene Marquardt, grew up on the south side of Shawano. He lived at the end of Washington Street.

A large part of what is now Kuckuk Park was the city dump when he was a boy. Charles Langhoff was the caretaker, and he was also in charge of the dog pound located in the area.

The dump was a busy place. Money was tight, and the dump was visited frequently by pickers with large metal hooks. They scratched through the debris looking for iron, copper or other objects of value.

Caretaker Langhoff also picked items out of the dump and used them to make interesting displays. One of the most memorable things he made was a train. He put the train cars on a nearby hill, giving the appearance of the train circling the hill. My hubby said it was very unique and as a young boy, he enjoyed sitting on his bike watching Langhoff build it.

Sat
28
Apr

Emergency shelter well covered during snowstorm

To the editor:

It has been heartening to witness and hear stories of neighbors helping neighbors and strangers helping strangers during and after the recent gigantic snowstorm. I would like to share another heartening story of SAM’s House emergency shelter during that snowstorm.

Normally open from 5 p.m. until 8 a.m. each night of the winter season, the full-to-capacity shelter stayed open from 5 p.m. Friday until 8 a.m. Tuesday thanks to the generosity and caring of so many. With nowhere to go during the day, staff and volunteers worked together around the clock so that guests could remain at the shelter during the storm. Those that could reach the shelter took extra shifts, covered for one another, and took turns sleeping and working.

Sat
28
Apr

Snowed-in resident grateful for neighbors

You have been hearing a lot of bad things in the news these days, but I wanted to tell you of something really positive. Something that makes me feel very blessed to be living in Shawano. From Friday, April 13, to Monday, we’ve had a nasty snowstorm that has piled huge drifts against our doors and our driveway. Our snowblower is not strong enough to handle this amount of heavy, wet snow all at once. Since I have old injuries to my lower back, it is very difficult for me to do as much at any one time, though I do try to push myself sometimes unwisely.

Sat
28
Apr

Student performers don’t disappoint

Editor:

Live theater is alive and well in Clintonville!

This weekend, I attended two great productions by school-age kids: the St. Martin and home-school shows.

Audiences at both musical shows included not only parents and grandparents, but many community supporters of the arts. They were not disappointed. Talented kids were molded by teachers and parents into polished performers. As a dancer, I was particularly impressed with the choreography executed by the large casts.

The St. Martin show included all seventh- and eighth-grade students in speaking parts, and fifth- and sixth-graders in the chorus. All were costumed in World War II-era garb. The home-school show featured a cast of 35 with actors from high school to what appeared to be kindergarten or less.

Sat
28
Apr

Lightening the load

Every good farmer has a love for their animals and their land. My dad, who went to be with the Lord nine years ago this month, loved his generational farm. Having much compassion for the farmer, he would always humbly ask God to bless “the tillers of the land.” Toward the last years of his life, he was unable to help my brother yet his heart was always out there on the farm.

After “retiring” from the farm, Mom and Dad moved to Marion to their little house in town. As they aged, they became more and more dependent on us four kids. My older sister accepted a good hunk of the responsibility, as she had no children of her own and lived close by. Before she’d leave, Dad would tell her, “Thanks for lightening the load.”

Sat
28
Apr

Turn in unused prescription drugs this Saturday

In 2017, the State of Wisconsin lost 827 people to the opioid epidemic. Last year, over 64,000 Americans died from a drug overdose. In Wisconsin, local, state and county officials are also combating methamphetamine, heroin and other substance abuse deaths. Each person who died was someone’s mother or father, son or daughter, brother or sister. Many of these mothers and fathers, sons and daughters, brothers and sisters were also part of rural America.

Today, in the midst of this nationwide epidemic, small towns and rural places from across America have been particularly impacted by opioid misuse. Opioids are highly effective painkillers with legitimate medical uses but they are also highly addictive by becoming a gateway to substance abuse, with users often transitioning from prescription medications to deadly drugs such as heroin.

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