Opinions

Sat
11
Nov

‘Thank you for your service’ least we can say to veterans

This is the week we celebrate Veterans Day. We honor our veterans and often say, “Thank you for your service.” Have we said it? Do we know why?

Recently, a movie came out with that very title. It is based on a true story of Staff Sgt. Adam Schumann from North Dakota, who was deployed to Iraq three times, the last in 2007. After Schumann’s service, his battle was back in the United States with post-traumatic stress disorder.

When Schumann was newly interviewed, he referred to the phrase “Thank you for your service” without criticism but posed the question of what the phrase means. This has had my mind wandering. What does the phrase mean, and what does that mean for those of us who have not served?

Here are some statistics provided by several resources — The Watson Institute, Brown University and Wikipedia’s United States military casualties of war — of which citizens might not be aware.

Sat
04
Nov

Letters to the Editor

To the Editor:

Orphan Grain Train has been receiving requests from Texas and Florida for tools and building materials for rebuilding homes. OGT purchased $40,000 worth of drywall, five truckloads of which were shipped to the Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Houston for reconstruction of homes.

OGT expects to be in Texas at least two years providing aid and relief for the victims. On Oct. 30, OGT will be sending two of their bedroom units — each one sleeps approximately 18 to 20 volunteers — to the Gloria Dei facility for meals and showers. OGT is also sending volunteer villages to Fort Myers so the relief workers have a place to sleep, eat, shower and store their tools and supplies.

Locally, OGT has been collecting new or slightly used clothing and miscellaneous items that we will ship to our distribution center in Westfield.

Sat
04
Nov

Lorge traveling the world to provide good plumbing

Humanitarians believe in the value of human life, and they do what they can to save/improve human lives or to alleviate suffering.

We have all heard of famous humanitarians to include Mother Teresa, Martin Luther King Jr., Mahatma Gandhi, Princess Diana, Angelina Jolie, Oprah Winfrey and Bill Gates, to name a few.

We have local people who also fit the description of humanitarian, but their good works often go unnoticed/unrecognized, and that’s OK with them. They don’t help others for the recognition.

Such is the case with Randy Lorge, instructor of plumbing apprenticeship at Fox Valley Technical College.

Randy told me, “To have the opportunity to change lives and even save lives, by doing what I do, is one of the greatest blessings God has ever given me.”

Sat
28
Oct

Letter: CAFO settlement is harmful to residents

To the editor:

Your Oct. 20 headline “DNR settles suit of large farm rules” was a disappointment. The article went on to explain the DNR “cannot make up the rules as they go along” and was very misleading.

The DNR agency has constraints with staffing, funding and support from our politicians. We all know, it’s who you know and how much you have that govern our laws in this country.

The Dairy Business Association has many lobbyists and is a daily presence in our Capitol. This article stated Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations can utilize animal run-off through a vegetation patch to filter pollution from their calf barns. It does not explain that this particular practice affected a field that abuts a natural wetland and river. The river is now contaminated with E. coli. The DNR was contacted by a resident about concerns of contamination of the river. The DNR stepped in and cited the CAFO to correct problems.

Sat
28
Oct

Letter: Tobacco compliance checks play valuable role

To the editor:

On behalf of Community Action for Healthy Living, we would like to thank the many clerks and retailers in Shawano County for keeping tobacco out of the hands of youth. Over the past couple of months, youth volunteers and have conducted tobacco compliance checks in hopes to see retailers are not selling tobacco to minors and are checking IDs.

Selling tobacco products to minors can have serious consequences for retailers. Wisconsin State Statute 134.66 prohibits the sale of tobacco products to anyone under the age of 18 and also requires training for staff that sells tobacco products. Retailers who sell to minors can receive fines as high as $500 for selling to a minor. Both retailers and any employees who make illegal sales are subject to fines.

Sat
28
Oct

Letter: No one should disrespect flag, anthem

To the editor:

This letter is to express my opinion about football players who disrespect our flag.

I am a 91-year-old U.S. Navy veteran of World War II and Korea. I believe that everyone owes respect to our country and the national anthem.

If anyone wants to protest about social injustice, free speech or political concerns, tell it to a reporter, but don’t use our flag, our national anthem or the NFL to show your agenda.

Many died for this great country. Don’t disrespect our country and our flag.

Lee L. Lemke,

Cecil

Sat
28
Oct

Conversation rules stand the test of time

The technology we use to communicate with one another has changed significantly in my lifetime. When I was a teenager, our (party line) telephone was on the wall. My parents allowed me to use the phone for brief local calls. The phone was in our living room and my folks usually heard my conversations. Today, most teens have cellphones. Many use their phones several times a day and conversations are generally private.

When I went to school, we passed paper notes to classmates; sometimes we got caught. Who remembers having pen pals? Handwritten letters and cards to friends and relatives were common. Today texting, e-mails and social media seem to be the popular means of written communication. Even electronic birthday cards are being sent. I still prefer receiving a letter or card in the mail as opposed to an electronic message. It just seems more personal to me.

Fri
20
Oct

Halloween combines myths, decorations and candy


Contributed Photo Scott and Tracy Marohl’s home at 14 Briarwood Lane is all decked out for Halloween.

Contributed Photo Scott and Tracy Marohl’s home at 14 Briarwood Lane is all decked out for Halloween.

Halloween is one of the most celebrated holidays, second only to Christmas. It is one of the world’s oldest holidays, dating back to pagan times.

Halloween evolved from the ancient Celtic holiday of Samhain. The Celts used the day to mark the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. They thought the change of seasons was a bridge to the world of the dead and the veil between this world and the next was thinnest this time of year. They believed friends and relatives who had died would return, with their souls inhabiting an animal, often a black cat. Black cats are still a symbol of Halloween.

There are many legends that surround this popular holiday. One legend has it that on one All Hallows Eve a priest was walking down a country road and while on a hill he saw a bonfire.

Fri
20
Oct

Letter: Lawmakers need to address drug pricing

To the editor:

The pharmaceutical industry does a fantastic job of developing and distributing modem lifesaving drugs. But, unfortunately in their greediness these same drug companies continue to gouge our citizens who need these drugs in order to maintain good health or in some instance to stay alive. In their desperation, some of our citizens travel to Canada or Mexico to purchase drugs at a far more favorable price.

Our elected officials need to step up, take this pharmaceutical bull by the horns and wrestle it down to a reasonable level of drug pricing. These politicians’ dependence on drug companies for election support needs to stop.

One of their first actions should center on repeal of the ridiculous laws that prevent any negotiation with drug companies in order to establish more reasonable prices.

Fri
20
Oct

Letter: Junior Achievement needs your help

To the editor:

The Wolf River District Junior Achievement program has enjoyed great support and success from the community since we all began to pull together in this effort here many years ago.

However, there still are many local citizens unfamiliar with its programs, initiatives and goals.

The local Wolf River Junior Achievement District is comprised of Shawano and Menominee counties, including the Menominee Indian Nation, and is one of 12 Junior Achievement of Wisconsin districts. It is also part of the national Junior Achievement USA program.

JA works to find local volunteers that go into the area classrooms with an established curriculum of interactive training materials unique to each grade level. Its purpose is to inspire and prepare young people to succeed in the global economy.

JA programs teach students about entrepreneurship and owning their own business, so they can be successful and remain a part of our local business community.

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