Opinions

Sat
30
Jun

Latest Phoenix Players show a success

To the editor:

Thanks to word of mouth and to good advanced news coverage by newspapers, television and radio, “Once Upon a Mattress,” Phoenix Players’ second production, was a huge success. Audiences delighted in the singing and dancing of the talented cast assembled by director Brandon Byng. Our first production was sponsored by the Lions Club, so on this effort we were “on our own.” Good attendance by enthusiastic audiences proved that our community appreciates and will support quality community theatre.

The auditorium at Rexford-Longfellow School does hold over 400, so we have plenty of room to grow. We would love to see it full for at least one performance of our next production. It’s good to have lofty goals.

Sat
30
Jun

Soccer coaches saw to it all kids played

To the editor:

I want to thank all the people that gave their time to coach soccer this season.

These people saw that the kids learned the basics of the game, saw that all the kids played and tried different positions. You can’t learn a game if you don’t get a chance to play. They saw that the kids had fun doing it.

A big thank you to all of you.

Lea Ann Wojta,

Shawano

Sat
30
Jun

Redistricting ruling puts onus on states

Partisan gerrymandering has long exasperated the Supreme Court, as its June 18 ruling in the case known as Gill v. Whitford attests.

The court found that the plaintiffs did not have sufficient standing to challenge Wisconsin’s statewide district maps. The plaintiffs claimed the maps were drawn to minimize the political power of the opposition party, thus creating an illegal “gerrymander.”

Politicians from both parties have long used their opportunities to redraw voter boundaries following each decennial Census for partisan benefit.

In 2011, Wisconsin’s redistricting process was carried out by one party in a rushed, secretive and lopsided way, resulting in rigged maps that have diminished competitive elections, decreased lawmakers’ responsiveness to their constituents and increased hyper-partisan legislation.

Sat
30
Jun

A veterinarian might save your life

Veterinarians at Cornell University just developed a 24-hour test that can detect salmonella infections in farm animals. Previously, it took days to get such test results.

The breakthrough will prevent diseased animals from entering the food supply — and thereby reduce the incidence of food poisoning and save lives. Currently, salmonella sickens 1 million Americans each year and kills hundreds.

This discovery underscores the critical role veterinarians play in safeguarding our food. Veterinarians are known as the people who treat our beloved pets, but that’s far from their only job. They also keep livestock healthy, shape public policy, and conduct groundbreaking research.

Yet the U.S. faces a severe shortage of veterinarians — especially specialists in livestock. That shortage has severe consequences not just for animals but for the health of the public.

Sat
23
Jun

Plants growing strong after record rainfall

The once-in-a-lifetime blizzard in mid-April became a nearly once-in-a-lifetime rainfall in the middle of June. It was getting quite dry around Shawano County, and I am sure most people were hoping for rain, but I am hearing reports of five inches in some areas.

Of course, we have nothing to moan about, as I cringe when I see pictures of the flooding in Houghton and Ironwood, Michigan, and parts of northern Wisconsin, where roads and streets have washed away or split apart from the power of the rainfall they got up there.

That is such a beautiful area, and I have many friends up that way. It boggles my mind when I think how life can change in an instant. As I wrote a couple weeks back, we can all have our own “lava” in our life; it erupts around us without warning. Yes, we don’t hear much about Hawaii lately, but the lava is still flowing there.

Sat
23
Jun

Dam helped bring paper mill to Shawano

I am often asked if I miss being in local politics. Serving eight years as alderperson and 14 years as mayor was one of the most wonderful and humbling experiences of my life. I do miss many aspects of public service, particularly the interaction with residents and employees. The communication I receive from you readers regarding my weekly column helps fill that void. I sincerely appreciate your comments and feedback.

Sometimes a reader requests information or suggests a topic for my column. Recently, I received a call from a local resident who asked if I knew anything about the old brickyard that was in Shawano years ago. I also received a call from someone who was interested in when the old Shawano dam was built.

Sat
23
Jun

Water level not only concern boaters should have

To the editor:

Boaters and personal watercraft users beware. The water level is not the only concern you should have.

The anchored/floating ski ramp, used by the Shawano Ski Sharks, located on the Wolf River by Smalley Park, fails to display proper lighting. There are laws pertaining to the lighting of such structures. Should an accident happen, who would be negligent in this situation?

Joe Skaleski,

Shawano

Sat
23
Jun

Obama wouldn’t get grief from meeting N. Korea leader

To the editor:

It is amazing how two people holding the same job are treated differently.

If Obama had met with the leader of North Korea, he would probably have gotten another Nobel prize, along with being named emperor for life. We now have more jobs available than people to fill them and still I hear people complain. If Obama and the Democrats had this kind of growth, every news agency in the nation would be singing their praises.

MS13 members are being targeted for deportation and Dems complain about human rights. What about the rights of those who want to walk around their communities without fearing for their lives? I am not singing the praises of the Republicans in Congress, as they are slow walking what the voters want.

Sat
16
Jun

Rhubarb can be tasty when prepared right

Is rhubarb a fruit or a vegetable? Actually, rhubarb is a vegetable that originated in China, Tibet, Mongolia and Siberia. In the American colonies, John Bartram, of Philadelphia, is credited with the first planting of rhubarb seeds in the 1730s.

Although rhubarb is a vegetable, for purposes of regulations in the United States, since it is used primarily as a fruit, it is counted as such.

Rhubarb is usually cooked and sweetened with sugar. It is called “pie plant” because it is often used as a pie filling. It can be eaten raw with a little sugar sprinkled on it, but it is commonly used with other ingredients to produce a dessert or sauce.

When preparing rhubarb, discard the leaves. They contain toxic levels of oxalic acid. Rhubarb stalks can be stored in the refrigerator for five to seven days, unwashed and sealed in an airtight plastic bag or tightly wrapped in plastic.

Sat
09
Jun

Ducks hatching in local yard becomes annual spring rite


Contributed Photo Jemima Puddle-Duck and her ducklings swim in a pool at the home of Holly and Jeff Zander.

Local resident Holly Zander has a renewed appreciation for one of her favorite childhood books, “The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck,” written by Beatrix Potter.

Little did Holly know that one day, she would have a duck tale of her own.

Nine years ago, a landscaper noticed a duck nest in the Zanders’ fenced-in backyard. Holly called the DNR to ask if there was something they should do. The agent told her it would be best to stay away from the nest. Once the ducklings hatch, he explained, they need to get to the water within 24 hours to feed on the algae. Ducklings are precocial, which means they are capable of swimming and feeding right after they hatch.

Holly commented: “Every spring, for the past nine years, Jeff (her husband — a well-known, retired local dentist) and I hear a loud commotion in our backyard. We smile at one another, knowing the ducks have returned, and the nesting process is about to begin.”

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