Opinions

Sat
23
Sep

Humane society could use your help

I recently joined the Shawano County Humane Society board. People have said to me, “Lorna, how can you stand to go out there? It is such a sad place. If I would go out there, I would want to bring all those animals home. It’s so depressing and sad.”

I explained, I don’t see it that way. I am happy for the animals that they have a warm place to stay. They are fed, watered and safe. Although the animals are well cared, what they do need is some love and exercise. The Humane Society staff is kept busy feeding, watering and cleaning. They have little time left to give attention to these precious animals. We are so grateful for volunteers, but we need more!

The purpose of today’s article is to ask you readers if you might have an hour or two a week to spend petting or walking these animals (who would be so grateful) as they wait for their forever home.

Sat
16
Sep

Nanny V has more children’s books on the way


Contributed Photo Vicki (Lamberies) Wartman writes under the pen name Nanny V. She has published two books and has plans for more, including Christian books for children.

Her pen name is Nanny V, but most of you know her as Vicki (Lamberies) Wartman.

Vicki was raised in Gresham, where her parents owned and operated the Woodland for decades. Many of you probably remember the Woodland II that Vicki ran successfully for several years here in Shawano.

Vicki is a self-motivated individual who puts her heart into her work. She was a Realtor for Hilgenberg Realty for about 20 years. While working there, Vicki’s mother was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.

Vicki commented: “I always promised my mother if I could care for her, I would never send her to a nursing home. My husband, John, was kind enough to allow me to bring both my mother and my stepfather into our home to live with us.”

Vicki continued: “My stepfather was a veteran, and he had some physical disabilities and later suffered from dementia. I retired from the real estate business because my family needed me. They lived with us for 12 years before they passed away.”

Sat
16
Sep

Letter: Alderman explains views on finance position

To the editor:

I am writing this letter to address a few inaccurate comments that were made in a recent article. I also want the residents I represent to know how I represented them during the hiring process of the finance director.

We did receive applications from applicants who I believe would have accepted the position within the original salary range of $75,000-$85,000. Three of the candidates interviewed actually live in the greater Shawano area; two of whom graduated locally.

It is often mentioned, “how do we get our graduates to return to Shawano?” This was a perfect opportunity, and I believe the candidates were qualified.

Upon learning of the hiring/salary of the new hire, finance manager Nancy Schauer, who worked for SMU for 30-plus years, tendered her resignation with an effective date of Oct. 6.

Sat
16
Sep

Letter: Health care forum sparks concerns

To the editor:

There was a lively health care discussion at the Shawano Civic Center on Aug. 28. Three area doctors conducted a forum for over 30 participants. The providers shared how the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) has affected their practices and how possible changes made by Republicans in Congress could affect health care in the United States. The discussion challenged ideas recently proposed in the attempt to pass a Trumpcare plan.

The doctors all agreed that the Affordable Care Act had made an impact on their patients.

Those who have health problems now go to the doctor for help rather than waiting as they had in the past and going to the emergency room when their health problems became acute. A concern was for the possibility that those with pre-existing conditions could be charged astronomical health insurance premiums if the ACA were to be replaced.

Sat
09
Sep

Recognizing stress 1st step toward relieving it

We have all heard someone say, “I am really feeling stressed out today.” Everyone feels stressed sometimes. Some people cope with stress better than others. Some recover quickly while others have difficulty getting past whatever has caused them stress.

Stress is how the brain and the body respond to demands. Every type of demand or stressor, such as exercise, work, diet, school, major life changes or traumatic events, can be stressful. A stressor may be a one-time or short-term occurrence, or it can be something that keeps happening over a long period of time.

Stress can be brought about by changes such as a loss of job, a divorce, a death, an accident or an illness. Routine stress can also be related to pressures of family, work, school or other daily responsibilities.

Financial stress is not uncommon. Growing tensions in our world, politics, increased violence, lack of respect for others, and environmental concerns can be stressors.

Sat
02
Sep

Here’s a primer on illicit drug use

When I attended high school, a few of my classmates smoked cigarettes. Sometimes, I heard there had been a beer party in a woods or gravel pit. I never heard anything about illegal drugs. Maybe I was just oblivious to it, but I knew nothing about drugs during my teen years.

In fact, I am still pretty naïve when it comes to drugs. However, I know it is a growing problem not just here, but also nationwide.

Wanting to write a story, but with limited knowledge about the subject, I asked our local law enforcement agencies for some information I could share with you readers. It certainly was eye-opening to me, and it may be to you as well.

I learned most of the common drugs have street names so they can be referred to during normal conversations without raising suspicions.

Sat
02
Sep

Letter: Presidents should live up to our highest standards

To the editor:

“Oh beautiful for heroes proved/ In liberating strife/ Who more than self, our country loved/ And mercy more than life./ America! America! God shed his grace on thee,/ And crown thy good with brotherhood/ From sea to shining sea.”

These beautiful words and lilting melody have the power to bring tears to the eyes of proud Americans across the land and political spectrum. America has always been great because of the selfless sacrifices of countless nameless Americans. America has always been a shining beacon of hope to a world awash in strife.

With increasing distress, Americans have watched the astoundingly rapid deterioration of many principles we hold dear. Dignity and civil behavior at the presidential level has in the past set our moral tone. Judicial judgments were respected and supported, and loyalty to the president was not a test of innocence.

Sat
02
Sep

Letter: Republicans reaping harvest of hate

To the editor:

Charlie Sykes presents himself as a responsible conservative on national TV. He protests the behavior of President Trump and indicates we should have known that President Trump had a limited view of American democracy.

Charlie Sykes and other radio talk show hosts like Bollinger and Rush Limbaugh have been running down our government and its services to society nonstop. Education has been one of their primary recipients.

They have demonstrated little regard for the facts, and now we are reaping a harvest from disenchanted Americans that wanted change, even if it is presented under the guise of white nationalism, David Duke and the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazi torch parades and the alt-right agenda.

I’ll bet the Cadillac Republicans in Waukesha and Pewaukee counties remain not offended by President Trump’s hateful behavior. After all, they played a major role in getting him elected in Wisconsin.

Herbert Grover,

Gresham

Sat
26
Aug

Humane society recognizes Marvin Popp


Contributed Photo Marvin Popp recently retired after decades as president of the Shawano County Humane Society board of directors.

The directors and staff of the Shawano County Humane Society recently recognized outgoing President Marvin Popp for his decades of service. Marv was a pioneer of the society.

Marv commented: “In the early 90s, my niece Renee Oh and her friend Kim Schmeider approached me asking for help. They had a rescue barn for stray and unwanted animals, but it didn’t have heat or water, and they knew they couldn’t shelter the animals in it over winter.

“The city had a wooded lot on Airport Road. They agreed to lease the lot for $1 a year. The lot was wooded and had to be cleared to make room for a small building. I remember taking down 18 trees, splitting the wood and selling it. The money was used for building materials.”

Dohn Zimmerman donated his time and equipment to bulldoze the stumps. The goal was to get the building built before winter.

Sat
26
Aug

Letter: Let’s eliminate racism, celebrate diversity

To the editor:

In response to the recent horrific events in Charlottesville, when a white supremacist killed and injured protesters, we feel compelled to write this letter, and to reject this violence and all that white supremacist groups stand for.

While news of the attack is shocking, the attitudes of these groups have long been a part of this country’s history and need to be challenged. We who share the same skin color as the people in these organizations bear a great responsibility to speak out against these groups and at the same time support efforts to heal the deep wounds caused by racist attitudes and actions.

These racist actions and attitudes commit violence against all people in our country. Whether it be the quick violence of the attack in Charlottesville, or the slow violence of discrimination and poverty, this violence ultimately damages the freedom we value as a society.

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