Opinions

Fri
23
Sep

Nursery rhymes don’t seem so innocent anymore

My mother often read nursery rhymes to me when I was a child. The book she read from was given to her by her mother. When I was old enough to read, I would sit for hours reading the nursery rhymes to myself. When I married, my mother knew how much I loved the book, and she gave it to me so I could read it to my children.

When cleaning a closet recently, I found the book tucked away on a top shelf. The memories overcame me as I sat on the bed and read Humpty Dumpty to myself. I am not sure if nursery rhymes are still being read to children, but they were once very popular.

I never thought too deeply about the troubling words of some of the rhymes until now. I decided to do a little research and learned some intriguing history I thought you might find interesting too.

The first known publication of nursery rhymes was in 1744 and the first confirmed collection of nursery rhymes using the term “Mother Goose” was published in 1780.

Fri
23
Sep

Letter: Gallagher best choice in 8th District

To the editor:

I have had the pleasure of meeting Mike Gallagher on two occasions. Each time, I have been thoroughly impressed.

As Mike Gallagher has served seven years active duty in the Marine Corps, I shared with him my son’s military aspirations. Mike gave me his personal contact information, noting that he is currently just a civilian, but would love to talk with my son, offering to provide guidance in deciding which route would best suit him.

I found that Mike Gallagher is truly concerned about the issues facing our community. This includes the challenges to the local employers, especially in the smaller cities, villages and townships of the 8th District. From the farmer to the papermaker, he understands the importance these local jobs have on the economic health of the area.

Fri
23
Sep

Letter: Open-pit sulfide mine would be bad for environment

To the editor:

My thoughts will be with the Menominee in October’s public hearing on the Aquila mine.

In the best circumstances an open-pit sulfide mine is terrible for the environment, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources have lingering questions about this one. Moreover, as happens too often, tribal concerns have so far been dismissed.

The promised jobs and revenue for Michigan may be enticing, and predictably Aquila Resources Inc. insists that the mine can be constructed and operated safely. We’ve heard this before. A spokesman for the Wisconsin Resources Protection Council says there’s no proof that the proposed plan can prevent acid mine drainage from contaminating the Menominee River.

Fri
23
Sep

Letter: King residents deserve better care

To the editor:

Wisconsin Republican scandal exposed: “State Raids Funds from Veteran’s Home” (Madison Capitol Times). That’s right. Scott Walker, aided and abetted by Republicans like Tom Tiffany, have been taking federal money meant to treat vets at King in Waupaca County and diverting it to the Wisconsin Veterans Trust Fund.

King residents are not receiving adequate care, even though Wisconsin brings in millions more each year than it spends on them.

How could this happen? In 2011, the state budget authorized the Department of Veterans Affairs to transfer funds from King to the VTF. In 2013, the Legislature made that authority permanent.

Question: Should the state be collecting federal money and diverting it from those who served and are now sick and disabled?

Sat
17
Sep

Packer pride has new meaning amid NFL protests

My favorite time of the year is autumn. I enjoy the cooler weather, the trees as they change colors, pumpkin pie and football!

My entire family enjoys football. We all love our Packers and cheer boisterously for them. My brother Joel and wife Barb live in Fort Collins, Colorado. He told me there are lots of Packer fans living there. Sometimes they have a Packer party and sometimes they go to a Packer bar to cheer with the other fans. A large wood bear wearing a Packer jersey and hat and waving a Packer flag stands proudly on their front steps.

Every Sunday morning, I talk with my brother Pat, who lives in Marion, about the week’s games. His wife, Rozanne, and their four sons are also Packer fans.

I should add, we are all Badger fans as well.

Sat
10
Sep

Help is available in elder abuse cases

Elder abuse and neglect is a subject not often discussed; however, it is a growing concern. Many elderly adults are abused in their own homes by a spouse, child, relative or caregiver. Elder abuse can also occur in institutional settings, especially long-term care facilities.

As people age, they often become physically frail and not able to defend themselves against physical abuse. They might not see or hear as well as they used to, which can lead to others taking advantage of them.

Sometimes physical or mental ailments of a partner is too much for an aging spouse to deal with, and mental, physical or financial abuse might occur.

There are different types of abuse. Physical abuse against an elderly person results in pain, injury or impairment. It includes not only assaults such as hitting and pushing, but also the inappropriate use of drugs, restraints or confinement.

Sat
10
Sep

Federal lands need to be protected

To the editor:

As a sportsman, I am getting very concerned about the continuing efforts of the U.S. Congress to sell or transfer our federal public lands.

In the last two years, there have been several bills that have been advanced and in some cases passed one house of the Congress. Our national forests, like the Nicolet-Chequamegon in northern Wisconsin, and our federal wildlife refuges, such as the Horicon Marsh, Meadow Valley and the Upper Mississippi River Refuge, are really important to hunters and anglers in the state, and provide many other recreational opportunities like camping, hiking and bird watching.

In addition, many people from Wisconsin travel and use the federal lands in the western part of our country to hunt, fish, camp and enjoy other outdoor activities. It would be a tremendous loss for us and future generations if these lands are sold off.

Sat
10
Sep

There are no perfect candidates, so voters must decide

To the editor:

During this past weekend, I spent a few hours tending the Republican Party booth at the Shawano County Fair. Occasionally a visitor to the booth would say that the Republican Party should have chosen a different candidate for the presidency.

In fact, the “Republican establishment” did not select the candidate! There were at least 17 Republicans vying for the honor of being selected as the party’s nominee. After hearing several debates, the millions of citizens who exercised their voting rights selected Donald Trump.

Nobody even needs to be a dues-paying member of any party to vote in the primary election. You only need to declare which party’s nomination process in which you choose to participate.

Sat
03
Sep

Dragging elder abuse out of the shadows

I am writing a two-part article about a subject that isn’t talked about often; however, it is a growing problem that needs to be discussed — elder abuse.

Elder abuse includes physical, sexual or psychological abuse, as well as neglect, abandonment and financial exploitation of an older person by another person or entity. Any older adult, in any family, could experience elder abuse. Sometimes individuals bear responsibility for the abuse. Sometimes ineffective systems bear the responsibility.

I have researched a variety of studies and have learned the following:

• One out of every 10 people ages 60 and older who live at home suffers abuse, neglect or exploitation.

• About half of people with dementia suffer from abuse or neglect by their caregivers.

• Cognitive impairment reduces financial capacity, increasing financial exploitation.

Sat
20
Aug

We all need a good chuckle now and then

Where did laughter go? Sometimes we take life way too seriously. Unfortunately, it has become common for people to run through life with such speed that there is no time to laugh.

I recently read children laugh over 300 times a day while adults laugh less than 15. What happens to us when we grow up?

My dad used to tell me, “Lorna, when you go through life there will be times you are sad, and you will cry. Cry when you need to, but remember to laugh when you can.”

He said, “Laughter can’t solve your problems, but it can help dissolve them.”

I am grateful the good Lord gave me a sense of humor. I have called upon it many times. Here is one example:

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