Opinions

Sat
25
Feb

Staying at Grandma’s house was always a treat

This is the second article in a series I am writing about growing up in the 1950s and 1960s. Looking back, I realize many families, like ours, lived quite modestly. We didn’t have a lot of material things. There were no cellphones, computers, video games or movies to rent during the years I grew up. We always found plenty to do.

On Sundays, our family often visited a relative or friend’s house. Most of our relatives lived in Shawano. Sometimes, they came to our house in Marion. Usually there was a card game. Every family had a penny jar. Besides Go Fish and rummy, I learned to play sheepshead, smear and poker. First the adults played, and then they let us kids play a few hands with them, too. Lunch was always served, as were a few bottles of Pabst Blue Ribbon or Adler Brau. Us kids had a root beer or cream soda.

Sat
25
Feb

Letter: First Amendment should get more respect

To the editor:

“Facts and truth are not partisan. They are the bedrock of our democracy.” — Dan Rather

I went to school quite a few years ago, but I do remember that the math and science I was taught was based on hard facts and data. Two plus two equals four then and still today. We cannot blindly believe tweets and demonize the free press, calling it fake news if it is in contrast to those tweets.

So much credence is paid to the Second Amendment, and it is a very important part of whom we are, but the First Amendment should be given at least as much respect, because what do we have left to defend if “we, the people” become isolated factions at each other’s throats?

Sat
25
Feb

Letter: Bonduel plans referendum information meetings

To the editor:

The residents of the School District of Bonduel are being asked to vote on April 4 on a resolution to exceed the revenue limit. Naturally, this type of referendum is sure to spur questions from community members. It is the goal of board members and administration to answer your questions and provide the reasons why the referendum question is being asked.

To help community members to learn more about the referendum, you can visit our web page at www.bonduel.k12.wi.us and follow the link to Referendum Information.

Also, the board and administration will host town hall informational meetings on March 6 at 6 p.m. at Bonduel High School and on March 21 at 6:30 p.m. at Bonduel Elementary School.

Board members will be visiting local government and civic meetings to answer questions, or come visit us at a regularly scheduled board meeting.

Sat
18
Feb

Letter: Hunters need to demand some changes

To the editor:

This past deer hunt was not good. Only the northern management unit had an increase in deer harvest. Generally, we have had a downward deer harvest for many years.

Sportsmen must show up at the spring CDAC meetings and the spring DNR hearings, whether or not you had success in 2016. I still believe that sportsmen overall are getting a bad deal on deer hunts.

My trail cameras, except for a few times, showed little or no deer activity. I hunt in western Shawano County. I had eight tags for bow and gun hunts issued by the DNR. How crazy is that? I did not fill a tag.

License sales were down in 2016. If things are not done to improve deer hunts, the deer hunts should be boycotted in 2017. DNR has a shortfall of $5 million. They want to increase fees. Why should fees increase when the product has not improved? Also, the DNR and state government have not stopped the spread of CWD in Wisconsin.

Sat
18
Feb

Letter: Admiration of Putin insult to US soldiers

To the editor:

Despicable is an inadequate term to apply to Donald Trump’s comments to Bill O’Reilly about “killers” from our country, as he shrugged off (literally shrugged) the alleged murders attributed to Vladimir Putin and his bloody regime.

For the president of the United States to publicly imply that mistakes (in his opinion) the U.S. made square evenly with a murderous authoritarian government is absolutely mind-blowing.

This president, who took deferments rather than serve our country in the military, who cared so little for his country that he refused to pay taxes, has the unmitigated gall to call Americans who defend the world against the likes of Putin “killers.”

My husband served honorably in Vietnam. Barely out of his teens, he risked his life every day to protect the world from the spread of communism. Now we have a president who defends and admires a brutal, soulless dictator.

Sat
18
Feb

Memories of picking beans and Friday nights in Shawano

Last week, I completed a series of articles written from notes by my Aunt Arline Roggenbuck, daughter of Walter and Martha Robenhagen. This is the first article in a series I will be writing about my memories of growing up in the 1950s and 1960s. I spent a lot of time with my grandparents, Walter and Martha, and I hope my memories will take you back in time.

I was in kindergarten when we moved from Shawano to Marion. I remember crying and not wanting to leave. I would miss my grandparents who lived down the street from us on Lieg Avenue. I would miss my aunts and uncles, cousins, kindergarten classmates and my teacher, Miss Howe.

Fri
10
Feb

Aunt Arline reflects on life, past and future

Today’s article concludes the four-part series written from notes by my Aunt Arline (Robenhagen) Roggebuck. Aunt Arline was the daughter of Walter and Martha Robenhagen, my grandparents. Next week, I will tell you about my memories of my grandparents from the 1950s and 1960s.

Aunt Arline wrote: “Our summers were busy. We had to pick potato bugs (no insecticides) off the entire large potato field. We always had to do our work before we could do anything else. I remember wanting go to a Fourth of July parade, but I had to unload hay into the hay mow and then push it down along the edges. The mow was small, but it all had to go in. I didn’t get to the parade.

Fri
03
Feb

Christmas celebrated differently in early 1900s

This is the third article in a four-part series from notes written by my dad’s sister, Arline (Robenhagen) Roggenbuck. Thank you for your phone calls, comments and cards telling me the memories this series has rekindled. Here are more of my aunt’s memories in her own words:

“The wash tubs were brought back into the kitchen for Saturday night baths. I remember all too well the times during the Depression when the only soap available was Fels Naptha or P and G laundry soap. Baking soda or salt did double duty as toothpaste.

“A hair curler on occasion would rest in the lamp chimney and when hot enough to sizzle when touched with a wet finger, we’d crimp our hair. Many times, the smell of scorched hair filled the room.

Fri
03
Feb

Letter: We need truth in government

To the editor:

It is a time in our history when we can’t believe everything we hear. Even our new president is notorious for false claims.

We know that, before becoming a candidate for president, Donald Trump told the public that he had proof that President Barack Obama was not born in the United States. He only admitted that Obama was born in the United States and thus a legitimate president when the lie started damaging his favorability ratings shortly before the election.

Since becoming president, Trump has lied about the size of the crowds at his inauguration by saying they were larger than at Obama’s. His claim can easily be disproved when looking at pictures of each crowd.

Fri
03
Feb

Letter: Russian hacks no joking matter

To the editor:

Tim Ryan missed the most important point in his article about the recent evidence of Russian meddling in the American political process (“County Dems hit by Russian hacking incident,” Jan. 20).

Ryan begins his article derisively when he asks if Shawano County is “holding tantalizing secret information that Russian President Vladimir Putin would like to get his hands on?” He concludes by saying the cost of repairing the hacking damage is comparatively small.

End of story? Hardly, at least not the end for responsible journalists. Instead of joking about the Russian hack and minimizing its effects, someone at The Shawano Leader needs to recognize what’s most important about the hacking incident. The Russian hacks are attacks on our democracy.

This is not a joking matter. The hacks transcend the political parties. This is serious business. This is about how our society functions or fails to function.

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