Community

Sat
01
Sep

A calf that needed rescuing

Normally, when the Black Angus mother cows deliver their calves, nature takes over and they immediately tend. The accompanying low moo as she talks to her new calf, along with mother’s sandpaper-tongue’s first bath gets the vital organs working and the blood chugging through the offspring’s system. As the calf struggles to stand, the mother cow nudges her gently toward the colostrum milk, and she receives life-sustaining nourishment.

Rarely does a mother cow abandon her youngster but occasionally, we do see that happen. Such was the case the other day.

My husband pronounced the arrival of another calf, “A heifer calf!” to me one day as I returned from work. Watching it intently as he does, he noticed it had trouble standing. It would stand for a while, then flop back down. Otherwise, the calf looked healthy.

Sat
01
Sep

Labor Day weekend means fair, fun and photography

I know that the official season of autumn doesn’t begin for another three weeks. However, there is no denying that it is well on its way. The splashes of color are everywhere in the trees, and the goldenrod stands tall with its yellow splendor and, yes, pollen.

Allergy sufferers are experiencing itchy eyes, scratchy throats, stuffy noses and, yes, maybe even a cough. I was tested in past years and was told I wasn’t allergic to the pollen, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t bother me. Wasn’t sure what that meant, but it seems every spring and fall, I am bothered by mold, pollen or whatever is out there.

This Labor Day weekend means back to school for most kids in our area and, as always, the great Shawano County Fair. I have always loved that fair — from my childhood, through the years I was a general leader of a 4-H Club and even now, as a senior citizen who still enters photography at the fair.

Sat
01
Sep

Tour company brings visitors to Wittenberg

Editor’s note: NEW Media recently chatted with Anne Schymanski of Courtesy Travel LLC, which organizes group bus tours out of Wausau. She was in Wittenberg on Aug. 9 with a group of 100 tourists enjoying a mystery tour.

Q: Who owns Courtesy Travel LLC?

A: My mom, Louanne Roehr, and a business partner opened Courtesy Travel in 1968 as a full-service travel agency. In 1989, her partner retired and Louanne became sole owner, employing four to six agents. In 2003, Louanne changed the business from a full-service travel agency to arranging and escorting her own group bus tours. I joined her in 2011 and took over ownership in 2013. I travel with the groups, and Louanne will get on the bus and help me out when I have more than one bus on a tour.

Q: What kind of trips do you do?

Sat
01
Sep

Centenarian has 100 years of ties to area’s history


Photo by Grace Kirchner Raymond Arndt, who’ll turn 101 in November, gives countless donations of his time, tools and talents to the Marion Area Historical Society. Its 30th anniversary was Saturday.

Ask 100-year-old Raymond Arndt about his secret to living a long life, and he’ll tell you his recipe is doing hard work and keeping busy — both of which will keep you out of trouble.

One of the ways the centenarian keeps out of trouble these days is helping with the Marion Area Historical Society, which celebrated its 30th anniversary Saturday. The society, which was founded in 1988 at the encouragement of the Marion Economic Development Corp., built its museum on city-owned land that was nothing but dirt, sand and a hill that Arndt recalled had to be lowered five or six feet to make way for a building.

The society later dedicated its East Ramsdell Street museum to Arndt in 2009 — thanks, in part, to the many tools, pieces of farm machinery and log home he donated to the organization. So many historical items have been donated to the society that the group is looking to expand and build an additional 60-by-100-foot building, Arndt said.

Fri
31
Aug

Animal exhibitors entrenched at fairgrounds


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Dallas Zernicke, left, with the Bonduel FFA, herds her pigs into their pen with a little help from Daryn Reinhard on Thursday. It’s not uncommon for most animal exhibitors to be on the fairgrounds from dawn until well after dark, caring for their four-legged entries.

Most visitors to the Shawano County Fair hang out for a few short hours — just long enough to see the exhibits, enjoy fair food and ride the rides.

For the individuals and families who show animals, however, the fair is almost like a second home, with many spending most of the six days on the fairgrounds. Whether it’s washing the animals or feeding them or keeping them from being too distressed by visitors and heat, many exhibitors arrive around sunrise each day and leave well after dark.

Megan Zeitler, a Corner View 4-H member from Bonduel, is in her fifth year showing at the fair. Her sheep take up quite a bit of her time during the fair, as she arrives daily at 7 a.m. and often doesn’t leave for the night until around 10 p.m.

“I just stick to sheep. It takes a lot of time,” Zeitler said.

Zeitler is constantly checking whether her sheep have food and water. She and other family members take shifts helping with the animals.

Fri
31
Aug

Shawano homecoming theme set

Entries are being accepted for the 29th annual Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce fall homecoming parade, which will be held at 6 p.m. Sept. 28 in cooperation with Shawano Community High School and sponsoring partners. The theme this year is “Movie Magic,” and participants are encouraged to decorate their entries within that theme.

Lineup for the parade begins at 5 p.m. on Elizabeth Street. Participants are asked to enter the staging area from Lincoln Street. The parade route starts at the corner of Elizabeth and Main streets, proceeds north on Main Street turning left at Green Bay Street, left on Washington Street and ending at Franklin Park.

Trophies will be awarded for the Best of the Parade, business entry, club/organization entry, high school entry and kindergarten through eighth grade school entry. To register for the parade, call the chamber at 715-524-2139, or stop by the chamber office, 1263 S. Main St., Shawano, to pick up an entry form.

Thu
30
Aug

Retired teacher publishes children’s book

Mart Grams’ granddaughter is afraid of Halloween. He asked her why, and she told him it was because of the masks people are wearing during the celebration. Grams talked with her about being afraid of other things, and it gave him an idea to write a book about children’s fears.

In his book, “Grandpa, I’m Afraid,” (published by Xlibris), Grams discusses the subject of fear among children. In the book, he and his granddaughters engage themselves in a conversation dealing with the things they are commonly afraid, of which include monsters, the dark, clowns or people in costume, insects, medicine and shots.

“Children are normally afraid of lots of things,” Grams said. “Parents often do not know how to deal with them and their fears. This book gives readers an example of a conversation between me and my granddaughters to help both parents and children.”

Thu
30
Aug

Marx holds on to the night at North Star

Richard Marx will perform live on Nov. 16 at North Star Mohican Casino Resort, W12180 County Road A, Bowler.

Tickets start at $35 and will go on sale Wednesday.

Marx is known for iconic ballads like “Right Here Waiting,” “Now and Forever” and “Hold on to the Night.” The singer/songwriter and producer is also responsible for “To Where You Are,” the first hit single from Josh Groban’s debut album, as well as N’Sync’s “This I Promise You.” In 2004, he earned Song of the Year for a collaboration that produced Luther Vandross’ “Dance with My Father.”

“Richard Marx is a powerhouse of talent,” said Michael Bonakdar, general manager of North Star Mohican Casino Resort. “We are thrilled to have him perform here and look forward to a great show.”

Wed
29
Aug

Newest barn quilt honors barbers with its pattern


Photo by Jim Leuenberger Shown with Shawano County’s 339th barn quilt are, seated, Dave and Alice Laux; standing from left, Linda and Jim Laux, Jenny Ballwahn, Jim and Kathy Cummings, and their children, Courtney, Brendan and Christa.

Shawano County’s 339th barn quilt is now on display on a barn at N4143 State Highway 22, a few miles south of Shawano. The farm is owned by Jim Laux. The quilt was sponsored by Full House Realty of Shawano.

The quilt pattern the Laux family selected is called Barber Pole in recognition of Jim’s mother, Alice Laux, who has been a hairdresser for 45 years; his sister, Kathy Cummings, who is also a hairdresser; and his dad, Dave Laux, who was a barber for 59 years.

Julius Piehl, Jim’s great-grandfather, came to the United States from Frankfurt, Germany, arriving in New York with $21 in his pocket. He had friends in Plymouth, Wisconsin, where he worked to save money to buy a farm and eventually to bring his wife, Bertha, to be with him in America. They had six children — Augusta, Anna, Gustav and Tillie, along with two others who died in infancy.

Wed
29
Aug

Yesterday tended by today’s hands


Photo by Charles Collier Nick LeNoble and his son, Caleb, of Marion, share a passion for car restoration, and are putting their handiness to use with MAHS. Here, the two stand with “a poor man’s tractor” restored by Nick, in front of the Ray Arndt Historical Museum.

Photo by Charles Collier Mary Kautz, of Clintonville, flips through a condensed history of the Marion Area Historical Society during the group’s 30th anniversary celebration Saturday.

The Marion Area Historical Society celebrated its 30-year anniversary Saturday at the Ray Arndt Historical Museum on Ramsdell Road, casting the 125-member organization into dual roles as historical subject as well as documentarian.

The historical society has proven an exceptional example of the latter over the last three decades as shown by the expansive museum named after Ray Arndt, an ardent contributor and supporter of preserving the area’s past.

Arndt made headlines last year when he donated a more than 2,000-piece collection of old and antique tools, the oldest being a corn planter from 1863 during the throes of the Civil War. But the 100-year-old spitfire has been integral to Marion’s history since long before.

Gesturing toward a stuffed horse and display buggy carrying a mother and daughter in their Sunday best, Arndt recalled one of the last times he was at the reins inside such a carriage.

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