Community

Fri
15
Jun

Kozlovskys reign at Strawberry Festival


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON The royal court of the Homme Home Strawberry Festival includes, from left, front row, Princess Alayna Rasmussen and Prince Trenton Schmidt; back row, Queen Donna Kozlovsky and King Jim Kozlovsky.

The Strawberry Festival is the biggest ongoing event held for the residents of Homme Home for the Aging. For the past 51 years, residents have enjoyed getting together with their families to enjoy strawberries and ice cream on the lawn while they listen to music.

The tradition of crowning a royal court is something that makes the event extra special, and residents look forward to it year after year.

Jim and Donna Kozlovsky were this year’s king and queen of the annual festival. They have been residents of Homme Home since October 2016.

Donna was born and raised on a dairy farm in Wittenberg. She enjoys spending time outside and gardening. This spring, she and Jim have been raising seedlings for Homme’s garden.

Jim was born and raised in Wausau. He was employed at Marathon Corporation and ran a Christmas tree farm near Birnamwood. He first met Donna at the tree farm. Jim enjoys spending time outdoors and bird watching.

Fri
15
Jun

DHS warning about tick, mosquito bites

The state Department of Health Services is strongly encouraging everyone to take care to avoid tick and mosquito bites as the weather warms up.

Both ticks and mosquitoes can transmit various illnesses. Lyme disease, which is spread by ticks, and West Nile virus, which is transmitted by mosquitoes, account for most of the disease spread by ticks and mosquitoes in Wisconsin.

A recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows Wisconsin among the top 20 percent of states reporting cases of tick-borne disease in the country. Wisconsin reported 4,299 cases of Lyme disease in 2017, the highest number reported in the state to date.

Fri
15
Jun

Clintonville woman loses 100 pounds


Contributed Photo Debbie Korb, holding flowers and balloons, started her 100-pound weight loss journey in February 2017. She is shown with fellow Weight Watchers member Mary-Beth Kuester, left, her husband Randy Korb and Weight Watchers leader Mary Jo Johnson.

After losing more than 100 pounds, Debbie Korb, of Clintonville, celebrated the accomplishment Monday with fellow members of her Weight Watchers group at the Clintonville Congregational United Church of Christ. They celebrated with a special “cake” made of watermelon and decorated with turkey pepperoni — Korb’s favorite snack.

Mary-Beth Kuester presented Korb with flowers and balloons. Since a balloon with the number 100 was not available, she was given numbers 80 and 20.

Korb started her weight-loss journey in February 2017. She said she was experiencing shortness of breath; her doctor, however, could find nothing wrong with her. “It must be my weight,” she recalled telling her doctor, and she attended her first Weight Watchers meeting that night. Her goal was to lose 100 pounds by her birthday this July. As of Monday, she had lost 101 pounds.

Fri
15
Jun

The Golden Fleece


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Many hands make for light work as Applewood Lane Alpacas owner Darlene Nueske is joined by employee Diane Hartleben and friends Renee Donneley, Norrie, and Chris Rogers, of De Pere. They are doing the initial cleaning of the alpacas’ shorn fleece, picking out dirt, twigs, hay and other impurities before it is bagged and weighed.

PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Applewood Lane Alpacas farm manager Justin Nueske shows an alpaca after shearing.

The 87 alpacas and six llamas that live at Applewood Lane Alpacas just south of Wittenberg got their summer haircuts last month. But unlike at the barbershop where the hair is swept up and thrown away, the alpacas’ valuable fleece was shorn, cleaned and sent off for processing.

“It’s a fun process,” said Darlene Nueske, farm owner, who’s been raising alpacas for nine years.

Shearing day began when Top Notch Shearing arrived at the farm at 7 a.m. May 16. Peter Hofmann, owner of the business based in Fort Collins, Colorado, said the Nueske alpaca farm is one of the largest herds he handles. He started the business 10 years ago and travels the country with his crew, stopping at 250 farms in 70 days.

All totaled, they shear about 3,600 animals. Most of the farms they visit have only 10 to 15 alpacas, Hofmann said.

“As an example,” said Hofmann, “Colorado has 110 farms but only 1,000 total alpacas.”

Thu
14
Jun

SLITHERING NEAR THE BOOKS


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Diane Moens, left, with the Fox Valley Herp Club, shows Bonduel Public Library visitors a jungle carpet snake, one of the larger snakes in her menagerie. Children and parents got to see some of the larger snakes close up and learned about which snakes are considered dangerous and which ones are harmless.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Abigail Manthey, 9, of Shawano, and Will Baciak, 8, of Bonduel, hold a couple of the snakes brought by the Fox Valley Herp Club to the Bonduel Public Library. For most of the children attending, handling the snakes was more enriching than learning about them.

Most visitors to the Bonduel Public Library wander, but some special guests on Monday slithered.

The library had Diane Moens of the Fox Valley Herp Club visit for one of its programs. “Herp” is short for herpetology, the study of amphibians and reptiles.

Local children learned a little bit about the snakes that were part of the presentation, but most of them were there for one reason — to touch the creatures.

Moens brought in a number of smaller snakes, but she also brought in larger serpents, including a jungle carpet snake. She told the families in attendance that she did not feed the snake its regular diet of rats beforehand, but that was a good thing.

“If you try to hold them after you feed them, they could regurgitate,” Moens said.

She added that the rats she feeds the snake are already dead, because live rats could just as easily attack the snake.

Thu
14
Jun

Wittenberg honey business a sweet success

NEW Media recently chatted with Wittenberg businessman Lance Low, who started a beekeeping business three years ago and is selling his raw honey under the brand Lowdown Honey.

How did you get started?

“My wife, Katrina, and I had been living in Antigo, and a few years ago my grandparents’ farm, Delbert and Mildred Low’s farm just outside of Wittenberg, came up for sale and we decided to make the move. Beekeeping was just something to do on the side.”

Why did you expand from a hobby to a full-time business?

“I had been working for the railroad. It was a great-paying job with a lot of great insurance, lodging, per diem and other benefits, but I was on the road most of the time. When the job ended abruptly, I got used to being at home but was undecided about what to do next. The bee business was something I just sort of fell into.”

What happened next?

Thu
14
Jun

Nature center plans day camps

Navarino Nature Center will host two day camps for local children in June.

The nature center will be holding its Woodland Fairy Day Camp from 9:30 am. to 1 p.m. June 14. It will be a day to spark imagination and will encourage children to investigate nature and participate in creating fairy dwellings from that nature.

Participants are encouraged to bring their best fairy dress for the occasion, although it is not required. The center will have fairy crafts, a fairy face painter, and will be hosting a Fairy Tea Party at the end of the day. Children ages 3-4 years old are welcome with a chaperone, while children ages 5-10 do not need to be accompanied by a chaperone. The cost to experience the magic of woodland fairies is $40 for members and $45 for nonmembers.

Thu
14
Jun

Farmers market returns next week

The Shawano Farmers Market will open for the summer season June 16.

The market will again be held at Franklin Park, 235 S. Washington St., Shawano.

The open-air market will be open 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays until Oct. 6.

Products sold include fruits, vegetables, flowers, landscaping plants, maple syrup, bread, fish, meats and select high-quality crafts. Local musicians perform, and master gardeners are also available to answer gardening questions. Family-friendly activities are also available during select market days.

Thu
14
Jun

Plant sale at Arbor View Gardens

A sale of rare and conventional plants will begin at 10 a.m. June 23 at Arbor View Gardens to benefit the gardens’ planting projects.

Because the winter was unusually harsh, the woody plant selection at this year’s sale will be more limited than in previous years. However, they plan to have an interesting selection of perennials available, including native plants. Heucheras or coral bells are the featured plants at this sale, and they also have a wide assortment of standard landscaping plants, including hostas and day lilies.

Many of the plants in the sale are donated. Any gardener wishing to donate his or her extra plants is welcome to do so. Admission to the gardens for the sale is by free-will donation, or by contributing one or more plants. Sale attendees are invited to check out the improvements being made at Arbor View — a public garden located a half-mile southeast of Embarrass on the corner of County Road C and Palmer Road.

Wed
13
Jun

SAWM’s annual fundraiser sets records


Leader Photo by Greg Mellis Golfers waiting to tee off on the 10th hole Tuesday are greeted by volunteer Monique Knope. The annual SAWM golf outing filled the Golden Sands Golf Course in Cecil. The annual event is SAWM’s largest fund raiser.

Shawano Area Waterways Management (SAWM) held its annual fundraiser Tuesday at the Golden Sands in Cecil.

The SAWM’s golf outing is its biggest fundraising event of the year, and board member Tony Zielinski believed this year’s event was “record-setting” in the amount of money raised for the program. Zielinski estimated that 160 members attended this year and raised around $1,500 for SAWM. All donations and time spent are given freely by volunteers. Zielinski stated that the high attendance is a “reflection of the community getting behind a valuable resource.”

A spirit of fun prevailed. There was a putting contest, a multitude of prizes to win, and refreshments to be had.

“It’s a good time, good people,” said golfer Jeremy Buenning.

“This golf outing is so critical in helping support the waterways. It’s cool to see people come out,” said golfer J.C. Reinke.

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