Community

Sat
15
Oct

When one TV dies, another one comes home

I was in seventh grade when the first TV appeared in my parents’ parlor. It wasn’t their TV; it belonged to my oldest brother and his prospective bride. Apparently, they found one on sale and purchased it ahead of their wedding.

When they married and found a place of their own, the TV went with them. TVs and stations were not what they are today. The picture was in black and white, and the shows were mainly musical, comedy or westerns.

There was “The Perry Como Show,” “The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show,” and who can forget “I Love Lucy.” We tried to watch “The Ed Sullivan Show” each week, and westerns like “Gunsmoke.” Soon more were added, such as “Bat Masterson” and the like. Some of these can even be seen in reruns on certain channels.

Now, there are more than three stations, and we have clickers, so we no longer have to stand up and walk to the TV to turn the knob to change the channels, or fool around with the rabbit ears to improve the picture.

Sat
15
Oct

Holiday events on horizon at Mielke

I ran across a Tibetan proverb in a very intellectual book I was reading. Well, OK, it was a magazine. I thought it applied to everyone: “The secret to living well, and longer, is to eat half, walk double, laugh triple and love without measure!”

A good thought to begin the month of October — or any month, for that matter.

Speaking of good thoughts, we are deep into plans for our second annual Merry Mielke Craft Fair, which takes place on Saturday, Nov. 12, at the Mielke Arts Center. The event begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 4 p.m.

Besides the wonderful holiday crafts, we will have music, food and surprises! Free admission, with donations accepted and needed. All proceeds benefit the Shawano County Arts Council and the events it sponsors, which is pretty much everything at the Mielke.

If you want to be a vendor, there might be a few spots open. Call Cheryl Folkerts at 715-745-6222.

Fri
14
Oct

Pathways speakers will discuss Route 66 trip


Contributed Photo Tracy and Peter Flucke will discuss their trip along Route 66 at the annual meeting of Shawano Pathways on Nov. 15.

Peter and Tracy Flucke, owners of We Bike, a consulting firm that advocates making communities healthier through improved recreational opportunities, will be the guest speakers at Shawano Pathways’ annual meeting Nov. 15.

The meeting will be held at the Washington Inn, 101 S. Washington Ave., Cecil. The event starts at 5 p.m., with dinner at 6 p.m. and the guest speakers at 7 p.m.

The Fluckes have traveled across the county many times by bicycle, including their most recent trip along historic Route 66, and will share their experiences. They will also talk about We Bike and the work they do in educating and encouraging others to walk, bike and enjoy the outdoors.

The meeting will also feature highlights of current Pathway projects, including the recently completed Yellow Park to Park Loop, a recap of the fourth annual Bike the Barn Quilts and election of officers.

Thu
13
Oct

UNIQUE STYLE


Photo by Rob Zimmer Plant crown imperials in the garden this fall for a stunning display next spring.

Photo by Rob Zimmer Autumn crocus bloom just a few weeks after planting during the fall season.

Fall-planted bulbs have arrived in Wisconsin garden centers, bringing dreams of spectacular spring color to gardeners across the state. Planting tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, allium and more in the cool autumn soil is a tradition for many Wisconsin gardeners, promising a stunning and breathtaking show of color once winter’s snows have melted away.

What we labor to plant now in fall rewards us with many weeks of color beginning in March and lasting through June. With proper planning and selection, it’s possible to extend the spring blooming season for several months.

Most fall planted bulbs are best planted in masses and swaths of color for a huge impact. Avoid planting in single rows unless you are seeking an intentional, formal and sparse look.

Thu
13
Oct

Cumberland named Shawano Optimist of the Year


Photo by Jim Leuenberger The 2016-2017 Shawano Optimist Club officers and directors are, from left, seated, Doug Erdman, immediate past president; Barb Schmid, treasurer; Dawn Knope, secretary; Gail Moesch, president; Gary Cumberland, vice president and director of fundraising; Jim Black, director of youth events; and standing, directors Greg Parker, Diane Lohff, Ryan Koenig, Lorine Raddant, Troy Edwards and Mark Kohl.

Photo by Irene Leuenberger Receiving the Shawano Optimist Club’s top awards for the 2015-2016 Optimist Year are, from left, Kay Bloomer, who received a life membership in Optimist International; Gary Cumberland, who was named Shawano Optimist of the Year; and Jim Leuenberger, who received a special president’s citation from Optimist International President Dave Bruns.

The Shawano Optimist Club recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, holding its annual installation and awards banquet at Four Seasons restaurant in Shawano.

Gary Cumberland, who is the club’s vice president and director of fundraising, was named Shawano Optimist of the Year. And for her participation in nearly all club activities and outstanding leadership, Kay Bloomer received a life membership in Optimist International.

Wed
12
Oct

Eland rail society has open house Sunday

The Eland Railroad Historical Society will host a free, end-of-season open house from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday.

On display will be the depot, artifacts related to the railroad day-to-day operation and historic pictures of the early days of the Eland Junction railroad and village, which was on the Chicago & Northwestern line.

Also on display will be the 8 1/2-ton Plymouth Locomotive, which operated at the former Ringle Brick Factory; speedsters, for inspection/work and tool wagons; a 1900s hand car (pumper); Mudge rail inspection car; and Model A fire truck, which has been fully restored.

Fri
07
Oct

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner The women of Holy Family-St. William Council of Catholic Women in Wittenberg are preparing for their Fall Bazaar. The crafts they will be selling include homemade garden decorations. Shown, from left, are DeAnna Godin, Marge Mech, Jenny Onesti, Ruth Brabender, Jeanette Wolff, Tammy Meverden, Bonnie Almazar, Ann Weller, Bev Lowery, Donna Suwyn, Linda Yenter and Mary Koeppel. Not pictured are Sue Balthazor, Lonna Kluck, Doris Ashenbrenner, Margaret Chase, Shirley Woyak and Karen Hendrickson.

The women of Holy Family-St. William Council of Catholic Women in Wittenberg are preparing for their first ever Fall Bazaar with three other churches — St. Paul Lutheran and Redeemer Lutheran, in Wittenberg, and St. John Lutheran, in Birnamwood.

“They asked us if we wanted to join,” said Jeanette Wolff, CCW president.

Each church will have something different. The women at Holy Family-St. William are making garden decorations that member DeAnna Godin saw at a craft sale in Caroline.

Two decorative plates are glued together and sometimes other small decorations are added. A fork is bent to be a holder and glued to the back, which then goes on a pipe in the ground. They can be stationary or can spin around.

The women have been getting together to work on the plates in the church hall.

“It’s more fun and we get better ideas,” Wolff said. “We enjoy being together.”

Fri
07
Oct

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner George Lazelere is a member of Bloecher-Johnson American Legion Post 502 in Wittenberg.

George Lazelere is a member of Bloecher-Johnson American Legion Post 502 in Wittenberg. He was born in Lily, graduated from White Lake High School and worked on a farm for a short time before joining the Army.

Lazelere served for three years in Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, getting out just as the Korean War was beginning. He returned to Wisconsin and worked at various jobs before spending 20 years at Mercury Marine in Cedarburg. When that plant closed, he worked in die casting at Tecumseh Products for 8 1/2 years in Sheboygan Falls before retiring.

Lazelere and his wife, Jan, moved to the Wittenberg area, where he and his nephew used to hunt. The couple was married 54 years before her death. They have two children, three grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Lazelere volunteers at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Big Falls, where he goes to Bible classes. He enjoys reading detective novels.

Q What do you do for the post?

Fri
07
Oct

Our naughty black Angus

Our herd of black Angus are growing round and sleek. They get along quite well, grazing their pasture together and munching on the good silage and big round bales my husband offers them. The fence that my husband and a few of his buddies put up has tested well. The care and determination they took as they constructed it has kept the blackies in and the varmints out. No coyotes or wolves … so far! The only concern we have is that the herd is getting to be quite, let’s just call it what it is: naughty.

One day, my husband was getting their wagon out to fill it as usual. He got off the tractor and pulled the gate shut, not locking it but just merely pulling it flush with the post as he has done every single day since they’ve been out there.

Fri
07
Oct

Capturing the moment has its moments

This has been a week of frustration around the Lehman household.

First it was my camera, which I thought I should use to try to get some kind of autumn pictures, even though the leaves are far from peak. So, I put it in the van, so it would be at the ready should that perfect opportunity arrive.

As I was driving into Tigerton that day, I noticed the flock of geese was at the pond by the high school. I was hoping to get a shot of the geese, so I stopped the van and got out with the camera to take the picture, and the camera would not work.

OK, folks, most people would get back into the van and figure out what is wrong with the camera later. Not me, no. I walk around to another position to see if it will work if I stand somewhere else. It did not, of course.

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