Community

Sat
22
Sep

Rest and recovery are key for distance running

What are signs of being overtrained? How do you know when you need a day off?

Rest and recovery are key components of training and allow your body to adapt to the stresses you are placing on the body. When we train, we cause irritation and inflammation to our muscles. Rest days give our bodies the opportunity to recover and heal the muscles so they are stronger than they were before we trained and better prepared for the stress of the activity the next time we engage in it.

By skipping rest days or overtraining, our bodies may actually begin to lose strength, speed and stamina. Overtraining not only causes a plateau in work-outs, it can also negatively affect the rest of body systems.

Runner’s World had a great article in the June 2011 issue. To summarize, they recommend paying attention to 10 markers. If you say “yes” to three or more of these markers, you should strongly consider taking a day off.

• You are losing weight.

Sat
22
Sep

Gotrocks Farm hosts fundraising event


Photo by Curt Knoke “Movement with Meaning” features a musical performance by Nell Buchman and dance by Pamela Ludtke. The benefit event for the Darwin E. Smith Community Aquatic Center was held at Gotrocks Farm on Sept. 8.

The refurbished barn at Gotrocks Farm has been the site over the years for annual fundraisers for the Darwin E. Smith Community Aquatic Center in Wittenberg. The programs have featured instrumental concerts, down-home singalongs and most recently an interpretive dance and music program.

On Sept. 8, “Movement with Meaning” featured dance and music inspired by the artistry of Isadora Duncan and presented by Pamela Luedtke, an associate lecturer with the dance department at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, where she teaches ballet and modern dance.

The event raised $7,600.

“Isadora Duncan is recognized as the creator of interpretive dance,” Luedtke said, “so I chose to do dances choreographed by her, as well as my own interpretations.”

Nell Jorgensen Buchman provided the accompaniment for Luedtke’s dance selections and played a few solo pieces on keyboard. Buchman teaches at Lawrence University and performs throughout Wisconsin.

Sat
22
Sep

Trips in the summer were always fun

In the 1950s, many families made do on one income. Dad was the sole wage earner in our family. We lived modestly, but we were happy.

My mother knew how to stretch a dollar. I loved going with her to the meat market. She rarely left without a few soup bones (thrown in) or a nicely marbled roast on sale. She made a shopping list and bought only those things on her list, nothing else.

Mother and Dad cut corners where they could. Although we lived modestly, my folks enjoyed taking my brothers and me on road trips when they could afford it.

We traveled both west and south. Dad’s favorite place to visit was Yellowstone National Park. Mother liked going to Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi and the Carolinas.

Fri
21
Sep

Basics of Medicare classes held

Navigating the different systems of available benefits can be tricky and frustrating. If you are new to Medicare or are a Medicare beneficiary, the Medicare Basics class might be right for you. The class will help you learn about Medicare introductory information and other Medicare options that you might have. The Medicare Basics class will be offered:

• Oct. 1: 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Shawano County Human Services Fellman Center, 607 E. Elizabeth St., Shawano

• Oct. 2: 10 a.m. to noon at the Wittenberg Community Center, 208 W. Vinal St., Wittenberg

• Oct. 2: 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Shawano Community Middle School’s community education room, 1050 S. Union St., Shawano

Thu
20
Sep

No one-size-fits-all cancer treatment plan

It can be tough for patients to keep up with all the changes in health care, particularly when it comes to cancer treatment options. While these options continue to proliferate, patients and providers still face multiple challenges in terms of optimal care. Everyone is unique, after all, and a treatment plan for one person may not be the best for another.

If you are diagnosed with cancer, treatment is decided based on a number of factors: Where the cancer started, the extent of its spread, your state of medical health based on your age and other health problems, what treatment options currently exist, and an understanding relationship between you and your physician.

Thu
20
Sep

Keshena gets $150,000 ‘Safe Place’ grant

The Menominee County Human Services Department in Keshena will receive a $150,000 USDA grant to upgrade a facility to serve as a Safe Place and a location for a mobile crisis team. The project is one of 85 that are being funded in rural communities across 22 states, said Frank Frassetto, Wisconsin Rural Development state director.

The Safe Place program is part of a national effort to help combat the opioid epidemic in rural areas. The United States Department of Agriculture is investing $10.7 million to support opportunities for drug abuse prevention, treatment and recovery.

Keshena’s Safe Place will be used for community support meetings and human services agencies to provide office hours for weekly and after-hours counseling sessions. It will also will have space for intake assessments and to stabilize individuals seeking opioid misuse treatment.

Wed
19
Sep

Nature center banquet coming up

The Navarino Nature Center (NNC) will hold its 29th annual fundraising banquet on Sept. 27 at The Gathering in Shawano.

Proceeds from the banquet support the school and public programs held at NNC. All funds raised at the banquet will be used for daily operations and programming at the center.

The nature center is a nonprofit organization that promotes environmental education programs to the general public and students in northeast Wisconsin. Volunteers, committee members and donors have allowed the nature center to make improvements to its facility and grounds, including the “Exploring Habitats” accessibility trail, according to event organizers.

The event will include raffles (electronics, basket, backyard, wingspan, gun, freezer, 50/50, all-ticket), and silent and live auctions. Photos of some of the items will be posted on the NNC Facebook site closer to the date of the banquet.

Wed
19
Sep

Free Dentistry Day serves 31 patients

Thirty-one Wittenberg-area people received free dental services from Quirt Family Dentistry on Aug. 24 as a part of Free Dentistry Day.

Dr. Benjamin Gauthier and team provided free oral health care to the community during Free Dentistry Day, a program initiated to provide dental care to the growing number of Americans without dental insurance.

The doctors and team members provided more than $9,900 worth of dentistry, including free cleanings, sealants, fluoride and fillings to local people throughout the day.

“We are very pleased with the success of this event,” Gauthier said. “Unfortunately, many people do not see a dentist on a routine basis. We were honored to open our doors to those in our community and volunteer our time and resources to make sure they received the care they need and deserve.”

The team of Quirt Family Dentistry would like to thank the volunteers who joined the team and donated their services to help throughout the day.

Wed
19
Sep

Local food requires forging relationships

The farm to table “phenomenon” has been around since the first time someone used a table to serve food. It’s a simple concept. Newly-harvested products are prepared and eaten at the peak of freshness. The process has been used by top chefs for centuries. Most would tell you that it is the secret to their success.

The fact is, from a historical standpoint, it’s only recently that chefs began to use processed and mass produced products. Traditionally, chefs and cooks built relationships with local farmers, butchers and fishermen, among others, who provided the raw materials for their trade.

As populations grew, and easy access to fresh ingredients became more difficult for big city chefs, the practice of farm to table cuisine became the exception rather than the rule. The new “normal” was to get products — from corporate processors — off the back of a truck.

Wed
19
Sep

Farm to Table event brings community together


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Larry Klement, of Shawano, scans the items available for appetizers at Saturday’s Farm to Table event at Heritage Park in Shawano. There were meat and cheese platters, a variety of fruits and vegetables and even some samples of duck.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Abigail Malcolm, formerly Abigail Zander, places cucumbers on a platter as she prepares some appetizers at the Farm to Table event Saturday at Heritage Park. Malcolm, who grew up in Shawano, is the catering manager at St. Norbert College.

Others in history might have sat along the banks of the channel between Shawano Lake and the Wolf River and simply enjoyed a meal.

The Shawano County Historical Society hosted a meal on Saturday, but with a little more flair. They brought almost 130 people to Heritage Park for a Farm to Table dinner that not only provided some insight as to where food comes from, but also how Shawano became the community it is today.

Candee Zeuske-Arndt and her sister, Cate Zeuske, coordinated the event, bringing in Twig’s Beverage, Nueske’s and other local and regional vendors to showcase the different foods produced in the area. Whether it was a simple meat and cheese platter or a sampling of duck, attendees got to enjoy a variety of foods from the regular to the rare.

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