Community

Fri
03
Mar

Friends

Once in a while during a news broadcast we hear of human interest stories that touch our hearts and move us to tears. On those occasions, I can be standing in the middle of the room my eyes filling, in a moment’s notice. Usually these stories are good-news stories, of people helping out in a tragedy, or someone giving a complete stranger a kidney, or a Go Fund Me account that garners hundreds of dollars in mere days.

One such human interest story came across Fox 11 News the other day. Wanting to learn more about the story, I Googled it and came across www.abcchicago.com where I learned about a couple of delightful children. Two little 5-year-old boys from Louisville, Kentucky, were best friends and attended the same school. When Jax, one of the little boys, was told by his momma that his wild hair needed a cut, he decided he wanted to get his head shaved really short so he could look just like his friend, Reddy.

Fri
03
Mar

Exploring the mysteries of vacuum cleaners

On Wednesday, as I watched the snow fall past my window, I was thinking of how March is coming in like a lion, and hoping it will remember to go out like a lamb.

Snow in March is not a strange thing, and as much as I was ready to see the end of the snow, it is rather pretty out. The driving and walking will have to be done with caution again, but we should be experienced with that by now.

Meanwhile, back in the house, I was having company over, and that meant that I had to drag out the dreaded vacuum cleaner. First of all, let’s look at the word vacuum. What possessed anyone to spell a word with two u’s together? I am not a great speller, and it is always a challenge for me to spell the word.

Plus, I wonder what my grandmother did when her rugs needed cleaning? I have an idea she did not have wall-to-wall carpet, and I would think any rugs she had were hung outside and beaten.

Thu
02
Mar

Clintonville tasting includes beer, wine, food

Tickets are available for the Clintonville Area Chamber of Commerce’s sixth annual Caps and Cooks Beer and Wine Tasting. The event will be held from 6-9 p.m. March 25 at Clintonville Lanes and Banquet Hall, 250 County Road I.

Tickets are $25 for a single, $85 for a four pack, $120 for a six pack or $215 for a 12 pack. A non-alcoholic ticket costs $10. Tickets are available at B & H Fashionwear, B & H Footwear, Tadych’s Econofoods and the chamber office. Ticket prices include a souvenir glass, Hawaiian lei, and tastings of wine, beer, cheese, chocolates and hors d’oeuvres.

Thu
02
Mar

GARDEN PRODUCT GUIDE


Photo by Rob Zimmer Roses and other flowering shrubs may bloom better with certain fertilizers and organic amendments.

Photo by Rob Zimmer Soils come in a wide range of styles and types. Some are best used in containers, while others are used in garden beds.

Many of the questions I receive from gardeners deal with fertilizers, soils, pest control and other products from the garden shelf. Visiting the garden center can be an intimidating experience for many gardeners, confused by the hundreds or thousands of different packages that line the shelves.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll take a look at some of the products found on the shelves at your local garden center and help make some sense of it all.

This week, the topic is fertilizers, soil and soil amendments. These products are often the most overused, misused and misunderstood gardening products. This misuse has an impact, as we see during the summer when many of our lakes and rivers turn bright green with algae bloom.

Have a soil test done

What type of fertilizer to add to a garden, lawn or container is probably the top question I receive from gardeners during the beginning of the growing season each year.

Sat
25
Feb

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner The St. Michael’s Angels sing and play at the Masses at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena. Shown with the Rev. Joel Jores are, from left, Riley Tucker, Ruthie Tucker and Mary Wilber.

Mary Wilber and sisters Ruthie and Riley Tucker comprise the St. Michael’s Angels. They play and sing at the 8:30 a.m. Mass on Sundays at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena.

The girls all play guitar, and Ruthie also plays the ukulele.

“I enjoy playing and I do it for my aunt who passed away,” said Mary Wilber, 15. “She liked to sing and I do it for her.”

“I’m in it because I really like to play music, and it feels good to help out at our church,” said Riley Tucker, 15,

“I do it because I love to play guitar and ukulele,” said Ruthie Tucker, 17. “I like to give back to my church as well.”

They alternate Sundays, playing their instruments one week and being accompanied by Jonathan Wilber on piano the next week.

The group formed four years ago when Dennis Jansen, a member of St. Michael’s, organized a group of adults and kids to sing and play instruments at Mass.

Sat
25
Feb

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Chantel Alveshire, right, volunteers with the Menom 4-H Club. Many of her grandchildren are in the club, including Kenew Bell.

Chantel Alveshire volunteers with the Menom 4-H Club. She was born and raised in Keshena, and graduated from Shawano High School.

Alveshire attended some colleges, then worked at a casino, as a jailer, in nursing and at a high school. She and her husband, Blaine, have been married 27 years and live on Legend Lake. They have five children and 16 grandchildren, and are raising a niece. Last year Alveshire bought her husband a Harley-Davidson motorcycle and they enjoy just taking off for a ride. They love to travel and have been to almost every state.

Q When and how did you get involved in 4-H?

A “I started about two years ago going to the Menom 4-H Club. I have 16 grandkids, and it was mainly us who kept on coming. I started letting other people know about it, and we now have between 15 and 25 coming to the meetings. We meet at the Culture Center twice a month on Tuesday from 5:30-7 p.m. We have a meal prior to the meeting.”

Q What does the club do?

Fri
24
Feb

Early thaw taps memories of making maple syrup

The unseasonably warm weather has put the pressure on maple producers. While the first days were a perfect time for the sap to run, the later days caused it to shut down, as the nights stayed too warm.

For a good run of sap, it needs to be below freezing at night, and sunny and warm during the daytime.

Some tapped early in the week last week, others a little later, and some might have waited, thinking that it will get cold again and they will tap when the real springtime temperatures arrive. The risk of tapping early is that the taps might dry up during the cold spell and not run again when the real warmth comes.

Fri
24
Feb

Speaker will offer advice for caregivers

Vicki Johnson, outreach specialist for the Alzheimer’s Association’s Greater Wisconsin Chapter, will be the featured speaker when the Parkinson’s disease support group in the Shawano area meets on March 14.

The group will meet at 10 a.m. in the Community Room at Shawano City Hall, 127 S. Sawyer St. The meeting is free and open to those with Parkinson’s disease, their caregivers, friends and family, as well as those who work with people with Parkinson’s disease.

The session will focus on caregivers of people with Parkinson’s disease and other related disorders. Johnson will share strategies for caregivers to take care of themselves so they can better care for their loved ones.

Thu
23
Feb

CREATING GARDEN GOLD


Photo by Rob Zimmer Creating your own rich, nutritious garden compost at home is one of the best things you can do to grow fantastic flowers and delicious edibles.

Photo by Rob Zimmer It is not necessary to spend a fortune to create a compost bin at home. This easy-to-use bin is created using mesh wire fencing attached to stakes.

Save money on expensive garden amendments every year by creating your own nutritious, organic home compost right at home. You don’t need to spend a lot of money or buy fancy equipment. It is easy work, and the rewards are priceless.

There’s nothing better for your garden soil then a yearly blanket of rich, organic compost that you’ve created on your own throughout the growing season and beyond.

A home composting kit is a great suggestion for those seeking to do more for the environment, right at home. You can find compost bins in many shapes, sizes and styles, as well as books on composting at home and other tools to make the job simple.

However, it is not necessary to spend a single dime getting started.

Getting started in home composting is simple. All you need to do is decide on a place to build your compost heap, or place the bin, and you’re ready to begin creating compost of your own.

Ready, set, go!

Sat
18
Feb

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner The Shawano Radio Controlled Flying Club will hold a swap meet and auction Feb. 26 at the Civic Center in Shawano. Shown with one of his planes is Blair Johnson, right, and John Gooding.

The purpose of the Shawano Radio Controlled Flying Club, founded in 1981, is to promote building and flying model aircraft.

Club secretary Blair Johnson has 13 planes and has been in the club for 10 years.

“I fly all different sizes and a little bit of everything,” Johnson said.

“I love flying,” said Johnson, who has his pilot’s license and used to own an ultralight aircraft.

The remote-controlled planes are built to scale of the original aircraft. They can have wings from 12 to 120 inches or bigger.

There are three types of planes: kit planes, wooden planes you build yourself following the plans provided; ARF, or almost ready to fly, which include pre-built frame and wings, but the electronics and motor need to be installed; and RTF, or ready to fly, which come completely finished.

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