Community

Thu
22
Nov

Grateful for those who bring justice

Every year, it seems that the holidays Thanksgiving and Christmas arrive, and we are scrambling to get prepared for family gatherings, shopping to prepare meals and all of the other trappings of the holiday season.

Thanksgiving, the “kick-off” to the holiday season, is that special time of year for all of us to reflect upon on our own lives, the lives of families and friends and, in my life as the district attorney of Menominee and Shawano counties, to reflect upon the importance of seeking justice on a daily basis for the people in Menominee and Shawano counties.

Since I have been serving as your district attorney, I continue to be thankful for the privilege that you have given to me, entrusted to me and have the confidence in me to administer justice for the bad things that happen to innocent people at the hands of others.

Thu
22
Nov

Why I give thanks

I give thanks for having the honor of being the executive director of the Rural Health Initiative. For the past 15 years, I’ve been involved in helping keep farm families healthy and safe. The Rural Health Initiative is a nonprofit program that takes health care directly to the farm — to bring prevention to the people, not the animals.

It was an idea that was started by ThedaCare in Shawano, many others involved in agriculture and the University of Wisconsin-Extension. It is a first-of-its-kind program in the nation. In 2004, I was hired to go to the homes of farmers to check blood pressures and test for high cholesterol and diabetes. I’ve found it humbling to be in their homes discussing something as important as their health. Many of the farmers along the way have become friends because we’ve shared stories about our families, the farm, finances and their well-being. It’s what I like to call “kitchen wellness.”

Thu
22
Nov

Grateful for every year of life

First and foremost, I give thanks for life.

I was a senior in high school and, living just three blocks from Appleton High School, I always walked home for lunch. It was Jan. 20, 1958, when I met Noel the postman on the sidewalk, and he said, “Sorry to hear about your dad.” I replied that he had been a bit ill but he’d be OK. It was but a minute later that Mom met me at the door and told me that Dad died.

It was a total shock. He was just 45, in the prime of life, and he was gone. It was news to me that he had had heart issues. Dad’s dad died at 43. Cancer. I approached my 45th birthday with trepidation, and every year since then my birthday has always been a blessing for me. For this I give thanks.

Thu
22
Nov

Grateful for family and community

I have been very blessed; there’s no doubt about that. Thanksgiving is the perfect time to reflect on these many blessings, and I’m honored to be selected by NEW Media to share my reasons for being thankful.

When I look back at my life, I know I didn’t do everything the right way. I had three kids by the time I was 22 years old, and our young family didn’t start out on the best footing. We didn’t have any money, but somehow we figured it out.

Back then, I was just trying to put food on the table, and I worked various jobs. I plowed snow and drove school bus, delivered oil and sold cars. I worked hard and put myself through school.

My father always told me I could be whatever I wanted to be, if I worked hard enough. My mom and dad, Carolyn and Brian, were always supportive and encouraging. I’m so thankful to have them in my life.

Thu
22
Nov

Grateful for family closeness

As the last of the autumn leaves fall from the trees, I sit here glancing out my kitchen window, contemplating the question brought to me: “Why do I give thanks?” As I glance over into the living room, there sits my wonderful, caring husband. He is whispering into our 1-month-old granddaughter’s ear. I ask, “What secrets are you telling her?” He responds, “No secrets. Just letting her know how blessed she is to have you as a grandmother and that I love you with all my heart.”

It is so easy to take people for granted, or even to complain and become angry because they do not meet our every wish, but we need to give thanks for those around us – our spouses, our children, our relatives, our friends and others who help us in some way.

Thu
22
Nov

Thanksgiving, a time for sharing stories

As the leaves turn crimson and begin to fall, we notice other signs of autumn — the geese flying south, sunsets coming earlier each day and the need to grab a jacket to ward off the bite of the early morning cold. As the days of fall grow fewer, our thoughts turn to the upcoming holiday season and our memories of Thanksgiving past.

For many, Thanksgiving brings the opportunity for quality time with family and friends. It also provides an opportunity for reflection on the many things that we are thankful for. Quite often, we are so wrapped up in the challenges that daily life brings that we tend to take for granted the gifts that have been bestowed upon us. The treasure of family and friendship.

Thu
22
Nov

Local physician assistant honored

Brenda K. Balthazor was recently named Physician Assistant of the Year by the Wisconsin Academy of Physician Assistants. Balthazor is a physician assistant with the Aspirus Health System and practices at the Aspirus Birnamwood Clinic.

Balthazor was one of six finalists from a field of hundreds of physician assistants across the state.

“I was thrilled to hear that Brenda was the recipient,” said Andy Barth, CEO of Aspirus Langlade Hospital. “She brings a deep commitment to our mission of healing, promoting health and strengthening our communities.”

The annual award honors a physician assistant who, among other criteria, demonstrates excellence in service to patients and exhibits involvement in the community.

Thu
22
Nov

SINGING AND DANCING FOR ‘PEANUTS’


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Linus, played by Ben Huber, left, and Charlie Brown, played by Brandon Byng, work on a book report about the classic “Peter Rabbit” in a scene from “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” The show is from the 1999 Broadway revival of the original musical, which is more than 50 years old.

The Phoenix Players already have two musicals under their belt, but this time, they’re working for “Peanuts.”

The theater troupe based in Clintonville will debut “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” next week with a twist. For the first time, it will be hosting a reception following the opening night’s show.

“We wanted to do something recognizable, and who is more recognizable than Charlie Brown and his friends?” said Brandon Byng, the show’s director and the actor playing the title character. “We’re hoping that will make people curious to come see the show.”

Patrons will be able to interact with the actors, get autographs, photograph selfies and even walk the red carpet. There will also be hors d’oeuvres and refreshments served.

“It’s not required, but we say that, if you want to dress up and make opening night a big event for yourself, you can,” Byng said.

Sat
17
Nov

Church basement women are more like second family


Photo by Leah Lehman Standing with the flowers, which are gifts for those with November birthdays at Homme Home, are Carol Lehman, Elaine Erickson and Betty Kohn. Kohn purchased the gifts.

In the 1970s, I was invited to come to Ladies Aid at my church. At that time, I had two children in school and two toddlers at home. I told the lady who called that I’d have to bring my children with me, and she answered with, “That’s OK. We like children.”

Well, my toddlers were well-behaved when I took them places — they were normal toddlers at home — so it all worked out. Somehow, I joined the Ladies Aid and never realized what that meant.

While we were called Ladies Aid, in the 1990s I learned that I really was a Lutheran church basement woman. It was about that time that I learned about a book by that name and, more recently, there was a play in the Midwest titled “Lutheran Church Basement Women,” which was hilarious. I saw it twice, both times in the Minneapolis area.

Sat
17
Nov

Neglecting friendship results in hurt, loneliness

As I grew up, my dad often gave me words of advice. I remember him saying, “Lorna, always remember, you are no better than anyone else, and no one else is better than you.” He also said, “When you know you’re right, stand up and defend your position, even if you stand alone, but when you’re wrong, be a big enough person to admit it.”

Dad also advised me, “Lorna, live your life so that, when you look in a mirror, you like the person looking back at you.” I must admit, recently I have really disappointed myself. I feel ashamed and do not like the person I see in my mirror.

During my tenure as mayor, I met many wonderful people. One of those people is a lovely lady who I would talk with at various meetings and events. She kindly invited me to be her guest at a few community events. We developed a mutual friendship.

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