Community

Thu
27
Sep

Little Falls and Gentle Ben

My mom and her boyfriend often took us kids to Little Falls, at least twice a summer. It must have been 15 miles north of the “Burg,” of Ogdensburg, where we lived. We jumped out of the Model A Ford and ran to the animal cages. It was our “zoo” with bears, a coyote, fox and raccoon.

Then on we would go to the swinging bridge across the Little Wolf River. We hung on so tight to the ropes that held it. Then down we went on the other side to the road that went across to a park.

In this park there was a lighthouse that completed the attraction — plus a tavern, of course.

We had heard of a little girl who had stuck her arm into the bear cage and tragically the bear bit it off. Everyone heard about it!

Our high school in Manawa was called the Little Wolf High School. Our 1944 class ring had a wolf’s head on it. I recently gave it to my granddaughter, Deni, who graduated exactly 50 years later.

Thu
27
Sep

Possible VA benefits for Lejeune veterans

From the 1950s through the 1980s, the drinking water at the U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, was potentially contaminated with industrial solvents, benzene and other chemicals.

Because of this contamination, the Veteran’s Administration is offering disability pay and health care for veterans, reservists and National Guard who served on base between Aug. 1, 1953, and Dec. 31, 1987, and later developed one of the following conditions: Adult leukemia; aplastic anemia and other myelodysplastic syndromes; bladder, kidney or liver cancer; multiple myeloma; Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma; Parkinson’s disease

Wed
26
Sep

Tigerton gets its just desserts


Photo by Charles Collier Trisha Hoffman, of Tigerton, gets ready to devour a slice of the well-reputed Applefest pies.

If the adage is accurate, then Applefest may have caused an incidental doctor shortage in Tigerton last Saturday, but considering that nearly 200 handmade apple pies were up for grabs, that might have been a good thing.

Applefest, now in its ninth year, is an annual autumn get-together put on by Tigerton Main Street in the village’s Legion Park. The event originally started to highlight multiple orchards in the immediate area with pie baking contests and endless amounts of apple treats. For-sale apple pies crafted by Virginia Kauffman and Cindy Miller, however, earned a timeless reputation that has sustained and grown attendance year after year.

“I don’t know if we even filled up half of that,” said Kauffman, referring to the park’s central pavilion, which was overflowing with nearly 50 food and craft vendors on Saturday. A steady stream of visitors were rolling through as well, many of them in Tigerton for the first time.

Sat
22
Sep

Seasons seem to rotate faster than geese flying in formation

As a child, my parents warned me that time would go faster as I got older. I have been understanding that for quite a few years already; however, 2018 seems to be going in warp speed. Snowflakes gave way to showers and mayflowers. Soon, the heat and humidity moved in, and the busy days of summer went past so fast.

By the time it got to mid-August, I was already noticing that signs of the impending autumn were all around for the eye to see. A leaf changing color, corn fields and soybean fields turning golden and allergies whipping up with the goldenrod in bloom.

From that, in the blink of an eye we moved right into September, with the official start of autumn being today. I had company for the weekend again. Before she came, I noticed that the artificial spring flowers were still in the vase on a side table, and there sat the ceramic bunny and goose. It kind of gave me a chuckle, as the living room still is decorated for Easter.

Sat
22
Sep

Free fall art show opens Saturday

“The More the Merrier” fall art show at the WOWSPACE opens Saturday and continues for the next three weekends, ending with the Miles of Art event Oct. 6-7.

The show features several artists who work in a variety of mediums. The exhibit will have paintings, photography, graphite pencil, jewelry, blown glass and fiber art. Many of the pieces are for sale.

The artists hail from Wittenberg, Mosinee, Kronenwetter, Holmen, Shawano and St. Paul, Minnesota. Many of them will be available to interact with visitors, though none will be doing demonstrations during Miles of Art.

The Focal Point Camera Club, which has members in Central Wisconsin, will have a major display.

Miles of Art started in 2010 as a way to generate tourism to promote the arts. Each artist pays a fee to be part of the program to help defer the cost of marketing the event.

Sat
22
Sep

Rest and recovery are key for distance running

What are signs of being overtrained? How do you know when you need a day off?

Rest and recovery are key components of training and allow your body to adapt to the stresses you are placing on the body. When we train, we cause irritation and inflammation to our muscles. Rest days give our bodies the opportunity to recover and heal the muscles so they are stronger than they were before we trained and better prepared for the stress of the activity the next time we engage in it.

By skipping rest days or overtraining, our bodies may actually begin to lose strength, speed and stamina. Overtraining not only causes a plateau in work-outs, it can also negatively affect the rest of body systems.

Runner’s World had a great article in the June 2011 issue. To summarize, they recommend paying attention to 10 markers. If you say “yes” to three or more of these markers, you should strongly consider taking a day off.

• You are losing weight.

Sat
22
Sep

Gotrocks Farm hosts fundraising event


Photo by Curt Knoke “Movement with Meaning” features a musical performance by Nell Buchman and dance by Pamela Ludtke. The benefit event for the Darwin E. Smith Community Aquatic Center was held at Gotrocks Farm on Sept. 8.

The refurbished barn at Gotrocks Farm has been the site over the years for annual fundraisers for the Darwin E. Smith Community Aquatic Center in Wittenberg. The programs have featured instrumental concerts, down-home singalongs and most recently an interpretive dance and music program.

On Sept. 8, “Movement with Meaning” featured dance and music inspired by the artistry of Isadora Duncan and presented by Pamela Luedtke, an associate lecturer with the dance department at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, where she teaches ballet and modern dance.

The event raised $7,600.

“Isadora Duncan is recognized as the creator of interpretive dance,” Luedtke said, “so I chose to do dances choreographed by her, as well as my own interpretations.”

Nell Jorgensen Buchman provided the accompaniment for Luedtke’s dance selections and played a few solo pieces on keyboard. Buchman teaches at Lawrence University and performs throughout Wisconsin.

Sat
22
Sep

Trips in the summer were always fun

In the 1950s, many families made do on one income. Dad was the sole wage earner in our family. We lived modestly, but we were happy.

My mother knew how to stretch a dollar. I loved going with her to the meat market. She rarely left without a few soup bones (thrown in) or a nicely marbled roast on sale. She made a shopping list and bought only those things on her list, nothing else.

Mother and Dad cut corners where they could. Although we lived modestly, my folks enjoyed taking my brothers and me on road trips when they could afford it.

We traveled both west and south. Dad’s favorite place to visit was Yellowstone National Park. Mother liked going to Tennessee, Georgia, Mississippi and the Carolinas.

Fri
21
Sep

Basics of Medicare classes held

Navigating the different systems of available benefits can be tricky and frustrating. If you are new to Medicare or are a Medicare beneficiary, the Medicare Basics class might be right for you. The class will help you learn about Medicare introductory information and other Medicare options that you might have. The Medicare Basics class will be offered:

• Oct. 1: 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Shawano County Human Services Fellman Center, 607 E. Elizabeth St., Shawano

• Oct. 2: 10 a.m. to noon at the Wittenberg Community Center, 208 W. Vinal St., Wittenberg

• Oct. 2: 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Shawano Community Middle School’s community education room, 1050 S. Union St., Shawano

Thu
20
Sep

No one-size-fits-all cancer treatment plan

It can be tough for patients to keep up with all the changes in health care, particularly when it comes to cancer treatment options. While these options continue to proliferate, patients and providers still face multiple challenges in terms of optimal care. Everyone is unique, after all, and a treatment plan for one person may not be the best for another.

If you are diagnosed with cancer, treatment is decided based on a number of factors: Where the cancer started, the extent of its spread, your state of medical health based on your age and other health problems, what treatment options currently exist, and an understanding relationship between you and your physician.

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