Community

Sat
13
Oct

Oh, how I love October


Leader photo by Greg Mellis A tree’s leaves turns yellow and orange while surrounded by other trees whose leaves are still green.

Oh, how I love the month of October! The colors alone are enough to make anyone fall in love with this month. Along with amazing technicolor scenery, making wood, sports and celebrations, October is a special month to me.

We are so appreciative of our woods. Heading out to cut, split and haul wood is hard work, but it’s worth it. I am so grateful for a warm farmhouse in the dead of winter. That penetrating wood heat just cannot be beat.

As I drive to my different work assignments, I soak in the scenery. With just two eyes and a finite mind, we cannot possibly absorb the beauty surrounding us. How can one appreciate it unless we purposefully stop and take a moment to gaze at this brief display of splendor?

Thu
11
Oct

Q&A with Reid Richards


REID RICHARDS

Editor’s note: The Enterprise and News recently chatted with Reid Richards, the new English teacher at Birnamwood Middle School.

Q: What is your work/education background?

A: This is my first year teaching. I graduated from UW-Eau Claire in December of 2017. Then I subbed in the Wausau School District. In the fourth quarter of the school year, I was a long-term substitute in a fourth-grade classroom. This was a neat experience for me because this was the elementary school that I attended. I am excited to be teaching in a middle school and work with a terrific team in Birnamwood.

Q: Where are you from and tell us a little bit about yourself?

Thu
11
Oct

Oshkosh museum prepares for Menominee exhibit

A collection of hand-carved art figures depicting the Menominee Clans Story is going on display in the Oshkosh Public Museum. The collection, which was meticulously carved and painted by Menominee artist James Frechette, had been stored at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point Museum of Natural History.

“The Oshkosh Public Museum is honored to have been chosen as the holder of these important clans figures,” said Brad Larson, museum director. “Each figure and its associated implements were done with authenticity and imbued with meaning and spiritual power. Once completed this spring, visitors will not only admire the beauty and spirituality of the figures, but they will also learn about their responsibility to the Menominee people and the natural world they are intimately tied to.”

Thu
11
Oct

Trunk-or-Treat, Halloween Hustle set in Clintonville

The third annual St. Rose/St. Mary’s 5K Halloween Hustle and Trunk-or-Treat will be held Oct. 26 at 140 Auto St., Clintonville. Costume contest categories are for kids, adults and groups.

Trunk-or-Treat will run from 5:15-5:45 p.m. This event allows children to select treats from trunks and participate in games. The $10 cost includes a bag, T-shirt, book and other goodies.

Costumes are encouraged for the family-friendly Halloween Hustle. Last year, nearly 250 people participated. This year’s event starts at 6 p.m. Cost is $30 per person and includes water stations and marshals along the lit course, a T-shirt, lighted safety armband, other gifts and automatic entry into a prize drawing. Group discount information is available on the event’s Facebook page.

Free child care for 5K and Trunk-or-Treat participants is available during the Halloween Hustle.

Sat
06
Oct

Seasons not transitioning like normal

There are four seasons of each year. Often, one gently flows into another, with only a hint of what is to come. This year has not quite gone so smoothly. I saw hints of spring, but then the blizzard hit and reminded us that winter still held its grip.

The snow melted rather quickly, and when the heat hit, it came with a lot of humidity. I saw hints of the impending autumn, but suddenly the weather turned cool, damp and rainy. Dampness makes things feel even colder.

Now that I have arthritis pain in my feet, the pain gets worse with damp, cool weather. So, while others wondered when and if to turn their thermometer up, I didn’t consider that at all. I turned mine up on the cool mornings — no guilt at all.

Sat
06
Oct

Recipes bring out flavor of Native American food

Native Americans retain a rich culture of traditional foods and the way they are prepared. These foods vary according to the environment where each tribe is located.

Native Americans were and continue to be hunters and gatherers. Many of their recipes include ways to prepare venison, fish, rabbits, fowl, wild rice, squash, corn, berries and mushrooms.

I didn’t have space in my last column to include some of the traditional Native American recipes. Thanks to those who gave recipes to me. I will include more of them in upcoming articles.

Chantel Alveshire and Mary (Tweet) Smith often organize fundraising luncheons to benefit others who have unexpected medical bills, lost their home or belongings due to a fire, or other emergency situations. Smith is well known for her tasty donations. Here is her recipe for cream of chicken and wild rice soup:

1½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Add kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste.

Fri
05
Oct

A CHILLING COMEDY


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Ingrid, left, played by Karen Fuller laughs as she turns away from Erik, played by Coulton Boughton, and Michelle, played by Maddie Stuewer, in a scene from “The Ice House.” The show opens Friday at 7 p.m. and runs through Oct. 14.

The latest show from Box in the Wood Theatre Guild will leave the audience with chills.

With a title like “The Ice House,” would you expect anything less?

The guild is performing the comedy for the next two weekends at the Mielke Arts Center, N5649 Airport Road, Shawano. While the play is based in Minnesota, most aspects will ring true for those Wisconsin outdoors enthusiasts who enjoy fishing on the ice in the dead of winter.

“The show is written by Peter Bloedel, a professor at Bethany Lutheran College in Mankato, Minnesota,” said director Sue Kluge.

Three men have enjoyed the sport for years, but one, Oskar, is no longer able to enjoy the thrill of the chase after he is forced to move to Florida by his needy sister-in-law, Ingrid, according to Kluge.

“She’s a bit of a user. She takes advantage,” Kluge said. “There’s different things throughout the show where the characters talk about how she’s finagled things.”

Fri
05
Oct

Crossroads Community Theatre rehearsing for fall play


PHOTO BY MIRIAM NELSON Cast and crew are working hard and having fun preparing for the next Crossroads Community Theatre production “Love Thy Neighbor,” which will be performed at the WOWSPACE in October. Shown are, from left, front row, Lois Anderson, Lisa Walkush, Jessica Gall, Dawn Meverden and Nancy Pehlke; back row, Dave Owens, Dale Hartleben, Dan Young, Paul Pehlke, Mike Gilbertson and Wade Fletcher. Missing from photo are Melissa Anderson and Cohen Wojnowiak.

It takes a lot of work to transform an art gallery into a theater space, but this year Walls of Wittenberg will have an added perk for the audience – new risers.

There will now be three viewing levels. In the past, two levels of risers limited the audience’s sight lines. They were also extremely heavy and had to be moved professionally to and from an off-site location. The new risers fold and can be stored at the WOWSPACE.

“We’re excited to have the new risers on-site, and we may be able to use them for other events or maybe even incorporate into our art show displays,” said Elaine Knab, WOW president.

The WOWSPACE was designed to be used as an art gallery. But twice a year, the Crossroads Community Theatre — the performing arts arm of Walls of Wittenberg — transforms the area to put on a comedy in the fall and a murder mystery dinner theater in February.

Thu
04
Oct

PREPARING FOR SPRING

October is prime time for planting and preparing spring bulbs for a spectacular showcase of bloom from April all the way into June. A few hard frosts and cooler soil temperatures make October the perfect month for planting spring-blooming bulbs in the garden and landscape.

Traditionally, fall means bulb planting as these treasured spring beauties require many weeks of cold temperatures in the soil in order to display their stunning spring colors.

Spring blooming bulbs provide a welcome burst of color after the season’s snows melt away and the drab landscape begins to waken with the new warmth of March and April. Favorites such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, allium and others are planted now to ensure a glorious spring emergence.

Thu
04
Oct

Cowles named Friend of Towns

The Wisconsin Towns Association recently honored state Sen. Robert Cowles, R-Green Bay, with a Friend of the Towns award during the monthly Shawano County Towns Association meeting in Angelica.

Cowles authored three pieces of legislation that were supported by the Wisconsin Towns Association in the 2017-18 session, including a clean water bill to help governments and residents repair or replace failing wells and septic tanks.

“I am honored to receive the Friend of the Towns award. Our local governments hold important and unique rolls in promoting economic development, protecting citizen’s health and welfare and improving the standard of living in their communities,” Cowles said in a statement. “Developing a state and local government partnership is crucial in advancing our state forward.”

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