Community

Thu
31
May

Prevea launches mobile mammography unit

Women who live in rural areas of eastern Wisconsin now have greater access to breast health screenings, thanks to a mobile mammography unit launched by Prevea Health and Hospital Sisters Health System.

The mobile mammography unit is making regular stops at Prevea Health centers in Shawano, Pulaski, Seymour, Oconto, Marinette, Gillett, Mountain, Lena, Kewaunee, Luxemburg and Manitowoc. Additional locations are being planned.

“High-quality health care, especially preventive health services and screenings, should never be difficult for anyone to find,” said Dr. Ashok Rai, Prevea president and CEO. “It should be readily available and close to home when you need it – and that is why we’re here. This is state-of-the-art technology on wheels that, with just some gas in the tank, can provide life-saving care to communities all across Northeast Wisconsin.”

Thu
31
May

Sun Drop Dayz pouring into Shawano


Leader File Photo Keyboard player Stephanie Reinl, left, greets fans as The Cougars take the stage during the first day of the Sun Drop Dayz festival in 2017.

Last weekend might have been considered the unofficial start of summer for most of the United States, but it’s this weekend when Shawano will declare that summer has arrived.

That’s when the community will celebrate the 2nd annual Sun Drop Dayz music festival. There will be plenty of the golden soda on hand for people to enjoy as they listen to several musical acts and participate in other family friendly activities.

Randy Bruce will kick off the musical lineup Friday, followed by Vic Ferrari. Saturday’s music begins with TravAce and the Generators, followed by Bill Miller and concluding that night with the Cougars.

There will be arts and crafts, kids activities and more. The nearby Sun Drop Museum will be open for extended hours both Friday and Saturday.

Thu
31
May

Raether answers God’s call, becomes deacon


Photo by Carol Wagner Todd Raether is the second deacon to serve Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Shawano.

Todd Raether of Shawano was at a youth conference in 2013 when he heard the call to become a Catholic deacon.

“I was asking God what I should do next,” Raether said.

He had previously considered becoming a deacon and serving his parish — Sacred Heart in Shawano — the previous year but said the new answer he got was pretty clear. He entered the five-year diaconate training program in April 2013 after getting the go-ahead from his wife, Mary Raether.

Because of the time commitment involved with becoming a deacon, spouses are very important and must agree to the process.

“She’s very happy,” Raether said. “As time went on, we became much closer.”

Raether was ordained May 12 by Bishop David Ricken at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral in Green Bay.

Tue
29
May

Heroes honored at Memorial Day ceremonies


Photo by Grace Kirchner Keynote speaker Lt. Col. Joseph McGrath, U.S. Army, left, and American Legion Commander Dan Rindt visit prior to the Memorial Day ceremonies at Graceland Cemetery on Memorial Day.

On the 150th anniversary of Memorial Day, which was originally designated as Decoration Day in 1868, the crowd at Clintonville’s Graceland Cemetery was reminded that “freedom isn’t free.”

The keynote speaker was retired Lt. Col. Joseph McGrath, U.S. Army, whose record includes 35 years of service to our country. “We are here to pay tribute to our heroes,” McGrath said at Monday’s ceremony.

McGrath repeated a quote from former President Ronald Reagan: “Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn’t pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected and handed on for them to do the same, or we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children’s children what it once was like in the United States when we were free.”

Tue
29
May

Memorial Day more than one day for those who served


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Sue Hintz with the American Legion Post 117 Auxiliary and Kevin Barkow, the post’s commander, bring the ceremonial wreath to the podium during Monday’s Memorial Day ceremony at Woodlawn Cemetery in Shawano.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Shawano County Board Chairman Jerry Erdmann talks about the importance of celebrating Memorial Day, but noting that those who have served remember those who have fallen every day. Erdmann described it as an “instant replay” where those in the service remember the sights, sounds, screams and prayers.

The rain didn’t stop Shawano’s annual Memorial Day ceremony from taking place. The rain stopped so it could take place.

According to Dennis Bohm, the master of ceremonies for the Allied Veterans’ ceremony in Woodlawn Cemetery, the festivities would have gone on even if the showers that crept into Shawano early Monday morning continued.

“We were not going to cancel, because those we remember here today served in a lot worse weather than this,” Bohm said, echoing his comments from the Veterans Day ceremony six months ago when it snowed. “It’s not just about remembering them today. It’s about remembering them every day.”

Remembering veterans every day is important to Shawano County Board Chairman Jerry Erdmann. A veteran himself, he told those in attendance that members of the armed forces who faced combat cannot forget what happened.

Sat
26
May

Memorial Day weekend a time for planting

What do most people think of when they think of Memorial Day? I would hazard a guess that most people think it needs another word added, they think it should be Memorial Day weekend. To many, it is a time to go up north, the start of the long summer weekends.

I guess being a farm girl for most of my life, I never got used to having weekends off. This time of year, I would be out in a field, likely picking stones so the corn could be planted, or helping plant the garden.

As a wife and mom, we were usually done picking stones by that time, but then I would be in the rush to get the garden in. I admit that, for me, Memorial Day weekend is a time to plant the garden. Earlier, there is more danger of frost, and later, well, then the produce of the vegetables are later, and the blooms on the flowers are delayed.

Sat
26
May

Meet Priscilla King


Photo by Carol Wagner One of the places Priscilla King volunteers is the Shawano County Historical Society. She stands in front of the Kast house beside an old fountain that used to be on Main Street and was used to water horses.

Priscilla King volunteers at the Shawano County Historical Society, the Crafty Boutique, and Wolf River Harmony.

King was born in Chicago and then moved around with her family, graduating from Little Wolf High School in Manawa. King returned to Chicago for a short time, then returned to work for her parents who owned Chef’s Inn. Her waitress career also was at The Patio, Al and Rosie’s, Club 22, and Jerry and Pats. King also worked at a dry cleaners, Charlie’s, and Results Broadcasting.

King and her husband, Eugene Sr., have been married 39 years and have a son. They live in the town of Belle Plaine and enjoy trips on their motorcycle, having been to 13 states and Canada. King is the secretary for Friendship Cemetery in Belle Plaine and a member of the Learn A Lot Homemakers of HCE.

What do you do at the Shawano County Historical Society?

Sat
26
May

Community food pantry helps Bonduel neighbors


Photo by Carol Wagner Jerry and Toni Schoepke take care of the Bonduel Community Food Pantry.

Jerry and Toni Schoepke do all the ordering and bookwork for the Bonduel Community Food Pantry.

“Before we did all the packing for three or four years,” Toni Schoepke said.

The pantry serves around 40 families who get food the second Wednesday of the month from 4-6 p.m.

The pantry serves people in the Bonduel School District. Toni Schoepke said occasionally someone needs food in an emergency outside the area, so they will help them and then refer them to their preferred area.

Feeding America is their main source of food along with donations and food drives. The Bonduel Post Office has a drive every year, and they also get food from St. Paul Lutheran Church.

Jerry Schoepke does the ordering from Feeding America online, and then another volunteer picks it up at the Shawano Area Food Center. They apply for a Thrivent credit card so they can shop for whatever else is needed.

“We look for bargains,” Toni Schoepke said.

Sat
26
May

NO REST FOR ROYALTY


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Prince Dauntless, played by Amanda Hein, right, is blue about still not being married to a princess in a scene from “Once Upon a Mattress,” but the rest of the kingdom, including, from left, the minstrel (Ben Huber), Lady Lucille (Cassidy Rose), the wizard (Tara Huber) and the jester (Brandon Byng), is hopeful the prince will find his one true love. The musical is based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Princess and the Pea.”

Your mattress doesn’t have to be lumpy to enjoy the Phoenix Players’ sophomore show.

The Clintonville theater group is performing “Once Upon a Mattress,” an adaptation of the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale “The Princess and the Pea.” The musical is known for launching the Broadway career of legendary funny lady Carol Burnett, who performed the role of Princess Winifred in its 1960 debut and two television incarnations, as well as playing the queen in a 2005 adaptation.

Burnett’s not in the show set to debut next week at Rexford-Longfellow Elementary School, but the show is familiar to director Brandon Byng. After helping to launch the Phoenix Players last year with the musical “Christmas … On the Air,” Byng is helping Clintonville to bring alive the show he previously directed with Abrams Spotlight Productions in 2014.

Sat
26
May

The many faces of spring

Oh glorious day, spring is here! After the blast of winter we endured, the sweetness and color of spring is a refreshingly welcome arrival. There are many faces of springtime in rural Northeastern Wisconsin.

Huge farm equipment is taking precedence on county roads, a visible reminder of exactly where our food comes from. I look in awe at the massive dual-wheeled tractors with 24-row corn planters in tow or hauling gigantic disks and drags. The tractor tires are taller than me!

Looking out over a field freshly dragged is a sight to behold. One day I came home and noticed my husband working up the field right next to the house. It was one of the first days he could get out there. I stopped and inhaled that earthy, rich aroma of black dirt getting worked up to receive the seed. Then we just wait for God to send warm rain and sun. I love it. I’m such a farm girl; no apologies.

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