Community

Sat
24
Jun

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Bob Klopke, right, and Ed Grys are members of the American Kitefliers Association. They will be at Fly A Kite Fest in Green Bay on Saturday, a fundraiser for Family and Childcare Resources of N.E.W.

Both Bob Klopke and Ed Grys enjoyed flying kites as kids. They are still enjoying that hobby as adults and members of the American Kitefliers Association.

“I’ve been making kites since I was a kid,” Grys said.

His passion for kite flying is evident in his home with kites on the walls and kite stickers on his van.

Bob Klopke, who lives in Gresham, has a similar story of enjoying kite flying as a kid and now enjoys making them and going to kite flying events. He got more interested in it after he and Grys did a kite workshop together.

“I didn’t know there was a group,” Klopke said. “I didn’t know there was any organization to any of this stuff.”

Both men have many kites that they have flown, often traveling all over Wisconsin along with nearby states. It is a hobby that men, women and children can enjoy.

Sat
24
Jun

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Sylvia Wilber is the pastoral council president at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena.

Sylvia Wilber is the pastoral council president at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Keshena.

Wilber was born in Keshena and raised in South Branch, one of 20 children. She graduated from Shawano High School and then attended Alverno College in Milwaukee. After one year, she went to the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, where she earned a Bachelor of Science degree in education and later earned a master’s in public administration from UW-Green Bay.

Wilber taught the primary grades in Appleton and Freedom, and then was the field representative for the Menominee Tribe for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She then was the director at Maehnowesekiyah for five years, followed by five years with the Oneida Tribe.

Sat
24
Jun

The month of June

The month of June brings juicy, ripe strawberries, fresh-cut alfalfa, thriving gardens and agricultural promotional events such as county Brunch on the Farm, which celebrates rural farm life, informing brunch goers about the benefits of agriculture and the how/what/where their milk comes from.

When we were milking cows, I always felt honored that there was an entire month celebrating the dairy industry, enlightening non-farm families of the goodness of the family farm. Now that we are not actively dairying for a living, I still feel that sense of pride and along with that, I harbor a knowledge of exactly of how much effort goes into producing a viable and diversified milk product.

Because I am a farm wife, I have always written with a female perspective. We are the support system behind our husbands, the oil that makes the farm operation run smoothly.

Sat
24
Jun

Animals provide planting challenges

It seems that while I was planting my small flower beds and some potted plants, little, or not so little, animals were coming along behind me and upending my best laid plans.

I purposefully was doing the planting slowly and methodically so I wouldn’t overtax my body in the hot and humid weather we were having. Little by little, I got the areas planted.

The day I planned to finish the task, I needed to go to the back of the house to get my wheelbarrow. The wheelbarrow is a handy thing, quite helpful in lugging things around and saving back and forth trips to the garage. This year, it is especially helpful, because the tire is filled with air, thanks to my son-in-law.

Getting to the patio in the back, I noticed that one of my bigger planters was knocked over and all of the dirt was scattered about. That was not the work of a chipmunk, nor a squirrel; had to have been a raccoon or a skunk.

Sat
24
Jun

Coffee, tea and atmosphere abound


Wolf River Media Photo by Miriam Nelson Emma Kait’s Coffeehaus owner Judi Hegewald, left, and her daughters, Kenzie and Kait, are ready to serve coffee or tea and healthy food made from good ingredients.

A love of history and a craving for good coffee drives the latest new business in downtown Birnamwood. Emma Kait’s Coffeehaus is the brainchild of Judi Hegewald and her daughter, Kait.

Hegewald has lived in Birnamwood since she was 8. Her maternal grandparents lived in the area, and Hegewald remembers hearing stories about her grandma, Emma, who would load up her kids in a horse and buggy to come into town to watch silent films on the back of the building Hegewald now owns.

Over the years, the building at 389 Main St. saw life as a drug store, a laundromat and a floral shop. When it came up for sale, Hegewald couldn’t bear to let someone else buy it to maybe tear it down.

Thu
22
Jun

SIBERIAN IRIS


Photo by Rob Zimmer Siberian iris come in a wide range of colors and patterns, like this beauty, Contrast in Styles.

Photo by Rob Zimmer The elegant beauty of Silver Edge Siberian iris makes it a new favorite among lovers of these plants.

After the bloom of tall bearded iris has begun to fade, their close relatives, the Siberian irises, begin to put on their glorious display.

Siberian irises have a different growth habit and form than the more common bearded iris. The leaves are slender and grass-like, while the flowers are often delicate in appearance and held on thinner, wiry stems.

The Siberian iris is much more tolerant of a variety of growing conditions than bearded iris. They will grow in just about any condition, from standing water to dry sand. Once established, the plants are quite forgiving.

These plants also do not require division nearly as often as bearded iris rhizomes. Clumps can remain vigorous for long periods of time with little or no maintenance.

Sat
17
Jun

Queen Bee geared toward women landowners, farmers

Registration is underway for the first Queen Bee event.

Women landowners and agricultural producers in Oconto, Marinette, Shawano, and Menominee counties are invited to attend an afternoon of conservation, coffee, cupcakes and company from 1-4 p.m. June 29 at Gillett Area Ambulance Service, 225 W. Park St., Gillett.

Attendees will discuss their connection to the land, farming interests, pollinator habitat, soil health, conservation practices, available financial resources and conservation programs.

Representatives from the Farm Service Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, state Department of Natural Resources, University of Wisconsin-Extension and Farmers Union will provide information and activities.

Participants will have an opportunity to view the NRCS Rainfall Simulator, visually illustrating how land management decisions impact runoff water and soil infiltration.

Sat
17
Jun

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Kim Ehrcke, a volunteer for the F.R.E.S.H. project, is in charge of the gardens at the Church on the Hill.

Kim Ihrcke volunteers for the F.R.E.S.H. Project. She was born and raised in Shawano and graduated from Shawano High School.

Ihrcke worked in real estate, mostly in administrative roles, and is now the administrative assistant at the Church on the Hill (United Methodist Church) in Shawano.

Ihrcke likes to garden, read and go to her grandkids’ ball games. She is an ambassador for the Shawano Country Chamber of Commerce.

She and her husband, Michael, who is a log buyer for Columbia Forest Products, have been married 35 years and live in the town of Belle Plaine. They have two children and four grandchildren.

Q What is the F.R.E.S.H. (Food, Resources, Education, Security, Health) Project?

A “It’s a new initiative in Shawano County focused on food access and education. Right now we do the agendas on three sub areas: food access, education and community involvement. I am co-chair along with Joanne Schedler.”

Q How is it being activated?

Sat
17
Jun

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Members of Zion Lutheran Church in Zachow are, from left, front row, the Rev. Rick Buhrke, Cathryn Siolka and Lynn Bartz; second row, Marilyn Klosterman, Barb Deering, Diana Radtke, Cathie Beilfuss and Marcy Siolka; third row, Dave Deering, Rhonda Buhrke, Bob Krause, Doreen Krause and Tracy Kleist.

Zion Lutheran Church in Zachow is preparing for “a church growth event” from 7-9 p.m. July 19 with the mission “Christ’s Caring Intensified in Congregation.”

“The direction of this mission is to grow all congregations, especially those with declining memberships and those threatening to close,” CCIC lay leadership member Rhonda Buhrke said.

The church received a $250 grant from Thrivent and a $500 grant from the North Wisconsin District of Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod to sponsor the event. Participating churches will receive some free resources and additional resources for a donation.

Pastor Rick Buhrke and his wife, Rhonda, started Family Crossfires, an intergenerational ministry, to reunite and strengthen generations in their faith when Buhrke was pastor at St. Paul Stony Hill and Zion in Gresham. After a short retirement, Buhrke was installed at Zion Lutheran Church in Zachow where he was able to continue his ministry.

Sat
17
Jun

Pa could tell a good story

My father lived a somewhat unusual life. He was born in the city of Milwaukee in 1900, the oldest of what would become a family of eight. One of his sisters is still living and will be turning 103 in July. That is my Aunt Gertie, whom I write about at times.

This city guy, who was my pa, went to silent movies and had to quit school after fourth grade in order to help out in the family bakery. The bakery was a huge building. They baked in the basement. The bakery itself was on the street floor, and the families lived upstairs.

By families, I mean my pa’s grandparents, a couple of aunts and uncles, plus my dad’s parents along with their children. They all had different apartments.

Eventually, his grandparents sold that bakery and bought a farm. After a few years of farming, they sold the farm and went back to a different bakery. A ghost lived in that second bakery.

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