Community

Fri
15
Feb

TEENAGE FANTASIES


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski J.W. Barlament, a 17-year-old high school junior from Oneida, sets up his books Saturday morning at Beans and Books in Shawano. Barlament has written two fantasy novels and self-published them through Amazon.

J.W. Barlament had an interesting trip to Shawano on Saturday morning.

On his way to a book signing and presentation of his two novels at Beans and Books in Shawano, he found himself in an unpleasant situation. Like many others driving Wisconsin roads in winter, Barlament’s car wound up in the ditch, and it appeared he would not make it to the presentation.

“There was this one fairly sharp turn, so I was just thinking, ‘OK, just slow down, and you’ll be fine,’” Barlament said. “I was going 15, maybe 20 (mph). Still went right into the ditch.”

Barlament had a shovel in his trunk to help dig himself out, but it broke as he tried to escape. Fortunately, the ditch in question was not far from his home, so he was able to secure alternate transportation to make it to Shawano, albeit an hour behind schedule, to meet potential new fans and sell some books.

Fri
15
Feb

Grant to fund healthy food, exercise program for Menominee

To help address some chronic health problems within the Menominee Nation, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Division of Extension has been awarded a $2.5 million grant. The money, which comes from the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will fund a project called “Kemāmaceqtaq: We’re all moving.”

“We are grateful to be a partner with Extension in addressing this chronic health issue,” said Brian Kowalkowski, dean for the Department of Continuing Education at the College of Menominee Nation. “Extension has decades of experience with evidence-based community revitalization and health promotion programs. History shows Extension’s commitment to sustained partnerships in communities and authentic relationships with local leaders.”

Thu
14
Feb

Buy Local, Buy Wisconsin food grants available

Farmers and businesses involved in Wisconsin’s food industry who are seeking to grow their local markets are encouraged to apply for 2019 Buy Local, Buy Wisconsin producer and processor grants.

Managed by the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, the grants can help farms and business more efficiently produce, process, market and distribute food in local markets — including stores, schools and institutions.

“These grants fund innovative ideas that help producers and other local food businesses become more successful at selling their local products around Wisconsin,” said Kietra Olson, Buy Local program manager. “We encourage growers and processors with projects that help expand Wisconsin’s food system to apply for the grants. Projects must clearly demonstrate a need, show creativity and help grow the food industry.”

Thu
14
Feb

Walk to Mary registration open

Registration is open for the seventh annual Walk to Mary, in which pilgrims from northeast Wisconsin and beyond will make the journey from the Shrine of St. Joseph in De Pere to the National Shrine of Our Lady of Good Help in Champion. The event date is May 4.

“The 21-mile trek from shrine to shrine is a wonderful reminder of the journey many of us take with Mary to Jesus,” says Pat Deprey, Walk to Mary co-founder, who also serves as the event director. “Faith is a test of perseverance. It’s the journey we take to get there that makes it worthwhile.”

The Walk to Mary will again be supported by Father Francis Hoffman. Known as “Father Rocky,” he is executive director of Relevant Radio, America’s largest Catholic radio broadcasting network.

Sat
09
Feb

The increasing aging population

When I look at all of us here in assisted living and think of all the other places for seniors and more being built, I can see a world dominated by an aging population. Many stay put in their care centers, but those of us who can still get around are seen at restaurants and casinos. The latter are popular entertainment spots where you sit and hope to get lucky.

Meanwhile, back at the ranch, activity directors try to entertain their clients, but most of us would rather sleep. They bring in musicians who think we are really ancient, playing Civil War songs, when actually, we are from the Big Band era. Card games and dominoes are popular, but bingo more so, where you sit like at the casinos and you hope your lucky number comes up.

Trips are scheduled, but not for those of us who can’t get around. We like our solitude and favorite TV shows. We sleep a lot, napping after breakfast and then after dinner too. So, we are not hard to please.

Sat
09
Feb

Q&A WITH HODAZHA-MANIWINGA PIDGEON

Editor’s Note: The Enterprise & News recently chatted with Hodazha-Maniwinga Pidgeon, senior public relations manager at Ho-Chunk Gaming Wittenberg about the casino’s first murder mystery dinner theater, scheduled for Feb. 13.

Q: This is the first time doing a murder mystery. How did this idea come to pass?

A: Ho-Chunk Gaming Wittenberg is always looking for new, innovative techniques and events to have for our guests. The idea came from the creative vision of marketing director Tracy Pecore.

Q: Where will the dinner and show be held, and how many tickets will be sold for the event?

A: The mystery dinner and show will be held at the River’s Edge Restaurant inside Ho-Chunk Gaming Wittenberg. There is room for 50 guests to participate in each showing. With each ticket sold, the guest will receive $25 Rewards Play.

Q: When does the show start?

Sat
09
Feb

Problems pile up like snowbank in polar vortex

There is nothing quite like technical problems to drive someone, who grew up in the 1940s and 1950s a bit over the edge. First, without any knowledge by me, my computer was chugging out a series of pleas to everyone on my email list, plus a few others, I believe, saying I was traveling, and could they buy a gift card for my nephew’s birthday.

I love all of my nephews, however, if I want to buy them a gift card, I will be the one to purchase it. Lots of my friends notified me, wondering if it was true. Having gotten some of the same emails from friends of mine, I knew right away someone was phishing or bugging my computer.

For my generation, knowing something is wrong, and fixing it are two different things. A change of password, thanks to my computer guru at Computer Haus, and things seemed to be fine, except suddenly my influx of emails slowed and then quit altogether. Emails are fine, a lot get deleted, but there are some business related, and are important.

Sat
09
Feb

County’s latest barn quilt an anniversary gift


Photo by Jim Leuenberger Shown with Shawano County’s 346th barn quilt are, from left, Lois and Dave Rohrer, Connie and Tim Rohrer, and Daniel, Julie and Mark Rohrer.

Shawano County’s 346th barn quilt, called Rohrer Tree Farm, is on display on a beautiful small barn at E11100 County Road C, Clintonville. The barn and accompanying land are jointly owned by Dave and Lois Rohrer and Dave’s brother, Mark, and his wife, Julie.

The inspiration behind the design of the quilt came from the tree farm’s logo, which was originally designed by Tim Rohrer, Dave and Lois’ son. The quilt was a surprise gift for Dave and Lois’ 50th wedding anniversary, which they celebrated in October. The quilt was given to them by their sons, Tim and Andy, daughters-in-law Connie and Elizabeth and their grandchildren and siblings.

“What a great gift,” Dave said. “Lois and I just love it.”

Sat
09
Feb

‘Always a Bridesmaid’ just getting started

While the soup is simmering, I can tell you about our upcoming adult comedy play, “Always a Bridesmaid,” which will be presented April 26-28 and May 3-5 at the Mielke Arts Center in Shawano. Director will be Miriam Nelson, assisted by Early Fuller.

Auditions were held on Feb. 8-9 for the roles of the bride and bridesmaids. However, we don’t always fill roles at the auditions, so feel free to call me at 715-201-1299, and I will pass on your inquiry to Miriam. An additional audition is usually possible.

As with every production, there’s always a need for people to help with costumes, props, ushers, backstage manager, publicity, etc. We have a job for you, so call me.

Sat
09
Feb

There’s a variety of ways to treat your child’s cold

The common cold is medically known as an upper respiratory tract infection. Despite the chesty cough that often sends us to the doctor, the lungs are not affected.

There are over 200 viruses that cause the common cold. Unfortunately, antibiotics have no effect on the common cold; you must fight the virus on your own.

While children average six to eight colds a year (double if in preschool or daycare), adults do not get as many colds. They’ve already been exposed to many viruses and have developed immunity.

December through April is cold and flu season, where viral illnesses are most common. A drippy nose usually lasts 7-10 days and a cough, 10-14 days. One child out of three will cough for up to three weeks, but the cough will actually sound worse as it gets better.

Colds do not usually wipe your child out; the cold symptoms often bother the parents more. Otherwise, kids act pretty normal except for the constant runny nose and cough.

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