Community

Tue
16
Dec

Strong Bones fitness program expanding

The Shawano County University of Wisconsin-Extension office will expand its Strong Bones Strength Training program this winter.

UW-Extension will run five winter classes at Zion Lutheran Church and will start a new class at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Shawano. In Bonduel, St. Paul’s Lutheran Church will host a class, as will St. Francis Solanus in Gresham.

Registration is open for classes that start the week of Jan. 5 and run 12 weeks, through March 26. Strong Bones participants attend classes for an hour, two times a week.

At Zion Lutheran Church, classes will be offered at 8:30 a.m. Monday and Wednesday, 2:30 p.m. Monday and Thursday, and 7:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Advanced classes will meet at 8:30 a.m. Monday and Wednesday, and 7:30 a.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

Class at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Bonduel will be held at 7:30 a.m. Monday and Friday. The classes at St. Francis in Gresham will be held at 5:15 p.m. Monday and Thursday.

Tue
16
Dec

RightCarePlus group plans now include ThedaCare

ThedaCare is the latest provider to join Arise Health Plan’s RightCarePlus program to help employers effectively manage health care costs and give employees control of their care.

ThedaCare is a community health system consisting of seven hospitals: Appleton Medical Center, Theda Clark Medical Center, ThedaCare Medical Center-New London, Shawano Medical Center, Berlin Memorial Hospital, Wild Rose Community Memorial Hospital and Riverside Medical Center in Waupaca.

ThedaCare also includes ThedaCare Physicians, ThedaCare Behavioral Health, ThedaCare at Work and ThedaCare at Home. With approximately 6,800 employees, ThedaCare is the third-largest health care employer in Wisconsin.

Fri
12
Dec

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Ella Shelley, who volunteers on Monday and Wednesday at Tigerton Elementary School, listens to Michael Weisnicht read to her in the school library.

Ella Shelley volunteers to help the kindergarten and first-grade students at Tigerton Elementary School.

Shelley was born and raised in White Lake, graduating from White Lake High School. She earned an associate degree in secretarial science at Northcentral Technical College and worked for a few years at a clinic in Antigo.

After Shelley married, she stayed home to home school her four daughters. Shelley and her husband, Dee, who is retired, have been married 43 years and live in Split Rock, where they are remodeling their home. They have 11 grandchildren who they often visit. They also like to travel.

The couple is involved in their church, Good Shepherd Baptist Church in Wittenberg.

Q What do you do when you volunteer at the school?

Fri
12
Dec

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Members of the Tigerton High School Spirit Club are, from left, kneeling, Morgan Marquardt, Lexy Krueger, Kelsey Berg; standing, Karli Minniecheske, Katie Watters and Caitlin Selle.

This is the second year of the Tigerton High School Spirit Club, which involves grades 9-12 and occasionally grades 6-8. It was started last school year by special education assistant Wanda Tucker and library assistant Debby Griepentrog.

“We wanted to get some spirit back,” Griepentrog said.

There are 20 active members of the club. Its mission is promoting school spirit and goodwill in the school, along with involving the community.

“This is my first time doing Spirit Club, but it is a lot of fun,“ THS senior Lexy Krueger said. “I love knowing that there is something I can do to help. The kids seem to love it too and it’s a good way to include the whole community.“

The two women put their heads together in the summer of 2013 and came up with the name.

“It covers not only athletes, but also anything to do with the school,” Griepentrog said. “We wanted to instill pride in the community.”

Fri
12
Dec

Traumatic ordeal

As much as possible, we try to remain accident-free on our farm. We know there are many circumstances where an accident just could not be prevented, but for all intent and purposes, we try very hard to stay safe.

As our kids grew up on the farm, there were the usual little scrapes and bruises, with a couple of mishaps requiring a trip to the doctor. One time a few stitches at the hairline was necessary. When we did need attention, we always received the very best care.

Fri
12
Dec

From van to Barbie car

Many times my readers ask me how I come up with the topics I write about. I always tell them that at times it is difficult, and at other times there is so much stuff going on, that I have multiple choices. This is a multiple choice kind of week.

When I wrote last week’s column, I had multiple choices already. Not only did I lose power the night before Thanksgiving, but my DISH network for the TV also was also not working for several days right after Thanksgiving. That was to be this week’s column, but now something even more urgent has happened, so the topic will be the van.

Sat
06
Dec

Holly jolly Shawano


Leader photo by Jason Arndt The Shawano Community High School marching band tunes the crowd of hundreds into the Christmas spirit Friday during the annual Santa Parade in downtown Shawano.

What a difference a year made at the annual Santa Parade as hundreds lined the streets along Shawano’s Main Street Friday.

The event was postponed one week last year due to subzero temperatures, but weather hovering around 32 degrees Friday encouraged one family to attend for the first time.

Brian Berg and his wife, Dawn, arrived with their children, 11-year-old son Matthew and 7-year-old daughter Emily, and his mother-in-law Chris Giese. They moved to Shawano six years ago.

“It is just the warmer temperatures. We’ve always wanted to come, but it has always been much colder than this,” Berg said.

Cold weather never deterred Cecil residents Joanne and Bill Wegnar from returning to the annual parade.

Joanne and her husband of 27 years began coming to the parade about 10 years ago while they were residents of Shawano, and reflected on past parades where they have enjoyed the experience of a community coming together.

Sat
06
Dec

Power an amazing thing until you lose it

‘Twas the night before Thanksgiving and all through the house, not a sound was stirring, not even a mouse. There were the normal house crackles, and strange bumps through the night, but the electricity was off, and that was not right.

The power went off at 5:35 p.m., I checked the breaker boxes, and all was correctly arranged. I called the company, and waited, and waited, and waited, and nothing changed. I called once again, in hopes for a different result, but nothing happened, and I was beginning to sulk. I made a third call, and pressed and insisted, “At least tell me someone is working on the problem.”

I was assured there was a confirmed power outage in my area, someone was working on it, but they had no estimate of when it would be fixed. My turkey was raw, my pumpkin pie not baked, how can I make them with no power. Thanksgiving dinner was at stake.

Sat
06
Dec

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Over 100 people attended the Young at Heart service and dinner at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Bonduel on Nov. 19. Enjoying the meal are, from left, Ron Rosenow, Marge Peterson, and Donna Seefeldt.

The Young at Heart services at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Bonduel held a special service and dinner on Wednesday, Nov. 19. There is always a meal after services, but on Nov. 19, in an effort to get more people to the service, the church followed up with a turkey dinner and fellowship.

“We called people and sent letters and postcards,” said Sandy Staszak, who helped Amber McCann, organizer for the special event.

The service and meal that started in the 1980s is held on the third Wednesday each month. Pastor Mark Palmer, who has been at the church for five years, said something similar was done at his previous church.

“It ended up being all that we were hoping it could be,” Palmer said.

Normally the service is held in the Gethsemane room, but over 100 people attended the event that was held in the church. Pastor Palmer gives a somewhat abbreviated service and Communion is brought to those who can’t come to the altar.

Sat
06
Dec

Sounds of the farm

There are many sounds of country living that are unique to a farm. Machinery and animals add to the cadence of everyday life.

The barn cleaner makes a certain shuffling sound as the paddles move the manure up and out to the waiting spreader. The milkers chug rhythmically with their own special tempo, the pulsators keeping a steady beat as the milk is harvested. The electric feed cart whines and hums as my husband takes it up one side and down the other, feeding. The productive fans stir the inside air all year long, keeping up a steady whir.

Cows, in different stages of their lives, emit distinctive noises that a farmer can pinpoint to a certain age or circumstance. For example, a newborn calf moos in a weaker, higher pitch sound than, say, a more mature heifer.

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