Community

Wed
04
Mar

Powwow helps melt away winter blues


Leader Photo by Jason Arndt Menominee tribal members, from left, Allex Awanohopay, Jaymin Boivin, Stewart Boivin Jr. and Adrian Queen stand for a grand entry Saturday at the fifth annual Winter Welcome Pow Wow at the Menominee Casino Resort in Keshena.

Leader Photo by Jason Arndt The Smokeytown Singers help launch the fifth annual Winter Welcome Pow Wow prior to the first of two grand entries Saturday at the Menominee Casino Resort in Keshena.

Hundreds of people converged at the Menominee Casino Resort in Keshena on Saturday to soothe the winter blues and kick off the powwow season.

The fifth annual Winter Welcome Pow Wow was conceived by the late William Pyawasit to bring together Menominee Indian tribal members and others.

Pywasit was a 1998 graduate of Menominee Indian High School and cultural teacher at Keshena Primary School prior to his death in 2012.

“It is kind of a kickoff of our powwow season and encourages everyone to get out of the house,” co-master of ceremonies Joey Awanohopay said. “This is a time where we can be sociable, dance and have fun.”

The Oneida, Ho Chunk, Chippewa and Stockbridge tribes also participated, along with representatives of the Lac du Flambeau and the Bad River Ojibwe, according to Awanohopay.

Sat
28
Feb

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Helen Kallies is the president of the St. Martin of Tours Council of Catholic Women at St. Martin Church in Cecil.

Helen Kallies is the president of the St. Martin of Tours Council of Catholic Women at St. Martin Church in Cecil, where she is a lifetime, third-generation member.

Kallies was born in Newald, north of Laona. Her parents moved to Cecil when she was a baby. She graduated from Shawano High School and started work at Fort Howard in Green Bay. Kallies then went to work in Milwaukee at the Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. She came back to Cecil and ran the Cecil Diner, then worked at Shawano National Bank and the Wisconsin Finance home office. Kallies then worked and retired from the University of Wisconsin-Extension as a 4-H paraprofessional. She is also a 25-year cancer survivor.

She is still a 4-H leader and chairs the 4-H Expo, which is public speaking, demonstrations, storytelling and illustrated talks. For 40 years, she has been a certified judge for Wisconsin county fairs.

Sat
28
Feb

Dvorak to perform at Beans & Books

Chicago folk singer-songwriter Mark Dvorak will present a special coffee house concert at 7 p.m. March 13 at Beans & Books, 1235 E. Green Bay St., Shawano.

Dvorak, who was named “Chicago’s Troubadour” by WFMT 98.7 FM fine arts radio, has sustained a career of performing, recording and teaching that has spanned more than 25 years. He has performed in 36 states and several countries with only his guitar, five-string banjo and his songs.

The Chicago Tribune called him “masterful,” while Sing Out! magazine said, “Dvorak shines!”

Dvorak’s 2011 Waterbug release, Time Ain’t Got Nothin’ On Me, received national airplay and rose to number 14 on the Cashbox Roots Music Report. His newest project, a book of essays and poetry titled “Bowling for Christmas and Other Tales from the Road,” has received glowing reviews and sold out of its first printing in nine days.

Sat
28
Feb

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Joyce Hagen is the facilitator of the Parkinson’s Support Group in Shawano. She and her husband, Ken, who has Parkinson’s, live in Shawano.

Joyce Hagen is the facilitator of the Shawano Parkinson’s Support Group. Her husband, Ken, has had the disease for seven years.

The group is for people who have Parkinson’s and their caregivers. They learn the latest treatments and talk about new medications and research.

“There are a lot of things that are going on,” Hagen said. “It’s not a pity party.”

Parkinson‘s is a disease that affects the nerve cells in the brain that produce dopamine. It’s a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system causing loss of control of body movement. There is no cure.

The group learns about the progression of the disease, which usually starts around retirement age. It can also affect younger people. Actor Michael J. Fox got it early in life.

“There are a lot of different symptoms,” Hagen said.

Some of them are shakiness, pain, inability to walk straight and losing balance. These things are caused by the brain’s inability to make dopamine.

Sat
28
Feb

We’re slowly marching forward toward spring

The month of January seemed to drag on and on, and I couldn’t wait to turn the calendar to February. Well, in retrospect, January was a lot nicer weather wise than what February has been.

It seems I never learn. Every year, I get to thinking that the thermometer will slowly rise as February arrives. Sure, I know that dips are possible, perhaps storms, but these constant below-zero nights, and single-digit days are wearing out their welcome.

Occasionally there is a calm, sunny, 20-something degree day, with snow melting, and that makes the spring fever come to the forefront. Then we plunge back down, and it’s time to bundle up again.

Sat
28
Feb

Sick of it

I don’t know about you, but I have had just about enough of this winter weather. I’m pretty sick of getting chilled to the bone as I battle these below zero temps, hunching forward, trudging out to the barn in the morning. Even layered as I am, the frigid air seems to have a life of its own, finding a way to creep down my collar or up my sleeve. It seems it’s been this way for far too long.

The other morning when I fed heifers, I bundled up in my usual manner, every inch covered with multiple layers. We had parked the skidsteer in the barn the night before after realizing we’d be in for yet another glacial night. It fired right off. Backing it out of the barn, I was immediately hit with such an icy blast of cold air it took my breath away, even though my mouth was covered with a long scarf, wrapped twice around my head!

Fri
27
Feb

Music is her passion


Photo by Carol Wagner Mary Jung has been playing the organ for area churches for 55 years. She is shown playing the piano at Evergreen Health Care where her aunt, Leona Zahn, is a resident.

Fifty-five years ago Mary Jung played the organ for her first church service on the first Sunday in Lent. Since then she has played at several area churches.

She started playing when she was just 12 years old at Pella Opening Church.

“I was going to help out,” she said.

Jung had only been taking a few piano lessons, so playing for a congregation was challenging at first.

“I really had to work at it,” she said.

As the years went by, she played at St. John in Leopolis, Zion in Gresham and St. Jakobi in the town of Richmond. She now plays at Zion for Sunday services and at Saints United in Gillett for Wednesday evening services.

“I love it, it’s my passion,” Jung said. “Playing organ is my way of praising God and thanking him for all of his countless blessings.’

Sat
21
Feb

Pleasant memories provide respite from stress

Stress is a five-letter word and seems to dominate our daily lives.

As I became a senior citizen, and continue in these “golden years,” I try to eliminate stress in any way possible. I say no more, I do things ahead of time and not wait until the last minute. However, no matter what I do, life seems to converge upon me at times, and sometimes I want to sit down and scream.

One of the definitions in the dictionary describes stress as “force exerted on a body that tends to strain or deform its shape.” I can’t say my body is strained out of shape, but I think some of my muscles and ligaments certainly are.

Finally, weeks of physical therapy have finally paid off, and that tight hip has loosened, and I am walking normal again. My left shoulder and neck have been acting up, to the point of being stiff and painful. It is telling me that stress has taken its hold on me once again.

Sat
21
Feb

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Jim Bartz is the president of the Shawano FFA Alumni.

Jim Bartz is in his second term as the president of the Shawano FFA Alumni, which will hold its annual Wild Game Feed this month. The group’s main purpose is to support the FFA.

Bartz was born and raised in Shawano, graduating from Shawano High School in 1986. He took the Fox Valley Technical College Farm Short Course for three years, earning a vocational degree. Bartz farms in the town of Belle Plaine with his dad and mom, Alvin and Nancy Bartz, with 200 head of cattle and 400 acres.

Bartz and his wife, Beth, a sixth-grade social studies teacher at Shawano Community Middle School, have been married 20 years and have two sons in high school. They spend a lot of time at their sons’ sports events. Bartz also referees basketball games and is a member of the Shawano Athletic Booster Club.

Q How did the Wild Game Feed get started?

Sat
21
Feb

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner A Tea and Trunk Show featuring clothing and artifacts from the Shawano County Historical Society will be held at the First Presbyterian Church Hall on Feb. 28. Jesse Borlen stands by a mannequin while Joan Wohler sits next to another in a 1920s baseball uniform.

If you’ve ever wondered what kinds of artifacts are at the Shawano County Historical Society, a Tea and Trunk Show featuring vintage clothing and other accoutrements will be held Feb. 28 at First Presbyterian Church Hall in Shawano.

Volunteers Jesse Borlen, director of the museum and artifacts, and Joan Wohler, head archivist, have spent months getting the display ready.

“For a long time, we’ve been trying to think how to display our clothes that are stacked in closets,” Borlen said.

Included in the display will be a 1920s baseball uniform, men’s and women’s clothing, and a top hat that belonged to the late Judge Charles Dillett.

“There will be about 100 items,” Borlen said. “Some people should recognize the names of the people who wore them.”

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