Community

Sat
19
Apr

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Sisters Janet Kahlow, right, and Linda Meisner are members of the Wolf River Master Gardeners. They are in Kahlow’s home, where she has many house plants, including the one held by Paul Meisner, Linda’s son.

Wolf River Master Gardeners might sound a little intimidating, but sisters Janet Kahlow and Linda Meisner said that is not the case.

“I find it fun and I enjoy the camaraderie,” said Kahlow, who is the president of the club.

The Master Gardener program, typically offered through universities in the United States and Canada, provides intense home horticulture training to individuals who then volunteer in their communities, giving lectures, creating gardens, conducting research and developing other projects.

The University of Wisconsin-Extension offers the Master Gardener program in Shawano County. The Wolf River group has 17 members. Other officers are Jackie Johnson, vice president, Deb Laehn and Mary Nordin, co-secretaries, Don Bublitz, treasurer, and Meisner, historian.

The sisters became Master Gardeners in 2011 after taking a nine-week class for three hours one night a week.

Sat
19
Apr

Volunteer Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner Caroline Galvin has taken over the planning of the Sacred Heart Council of Catholic Women’s rummage sales and funeral dinners. She is shown with her granddaughter, Hali Wilhelm, 6, who was visiting from Wausau, and the Galvin dog, Tippy.

Caroline Galvin is in charge of the rummage sales and funeral dinners at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Shawano. Galvin was born in Rosholt, moved to Ripon when she was in the sixth grade and graduated from Ripon High School.

After high school, she worked in a grocery store. After she married, she was a stay-at-home mom. She and her husband, Bob, have been married 49 years and have three children and four grandchildren, with a great-grandchild on the way. They moved to Shawano in 1987 when Bob worked for Urban/Frontier. Caroline worked at Palmer’s Quality Bake Shoppe, T&C Supermarket and Walmart. She has been retired for four years and spends time babysitting her granddaughter, Alexis Cherney, who lives in Shawano, along with camping and taking road trips with her husband when time allows.

Q Why did you volunteer to take charge of the rummage sales and funeral dinners?

Sat
19
Apr

He is risen

We’ve had some tragic events occur in our little town of Leopolis just lately that have rocked most of us here to the very core of our being. The early, untimely passing of a couple of people in the prime of their lives have left us bewildered and dazed, with many questions remaining unanswered.

We were born with a desire and predestined longing to live, so when people pass away unexpectedly, it comes as a stark realization that life is fragile, and each day is a gift, not to be taken for granted. And we do take so much for granted; planning how we will spend tomorrow, next week, next month or next year. Not one of us has a guarantee that we will be on this good Earth even one more day.

Sat
19
Apr

Winter, spring share this week

The weather of the week before Easter has left many of us Wisconsinites confused as to what season this really is. However, in retrospect, it is common to get snow in April, but perhaps we are used to it melting within a couple of hours, and not having a cold and wet full week of mix.

Again, I say, we are made of sterner stuff than this, and instead of looking at the downside of the snow, I looked outside and saw the beauty of God’s creation.

I can’t ever remember snow hanging on trees, and everything else, for as long as Monday’s snow did. I admit, I was even a little excited. As the winter passed, I never felt the urge to pick up my camera, go outside and shoot winter photos. April 14 gave me that chance.

Sat
19
Apr

Benefit planned for man fighting brain tumor

A benefit will be held April 26 in Clintonville to help an area man recovering from his fourth brain surgery.

The medical bills for Kenneth McCarten, 37, have added up to more than $400,000 since August, when doctors at Shawano Medical Center first discovered he had a 5-inch brain tumor. McCarten had suffered horrendous unexplained headaches for months prior to the diagnosis.

After the tumor was found, McCarten was immediately flown to the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in Madison, where he began a fight for his life. He has since undergone more than 30 hours of surgery and many hours of therapy, with many more to go. Months of radiation therapy start this month.

McCarten has lost some peripheral vision and is suffering short-term memory loss. He lives at home with his 11-year-old son and fiancee. He has been unable to work. He does have health insurance but more help is needed.

Fri
18
Apr

New Box in the Wood play going swimmingly


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Lexie, right, played by Jodi Angeli, has it out with her swim captain, Sheree, played by Mielke newcomer Jennifer Blake, during a rehearsal for “The Dixie Swim Club” Sunday afternoon. The show follows the lives of five Southern women years after they swam together on a college team.

Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Mary Madsen, who plays Dinah, pours herself a drink in one of the scenes for “The Dixie Swim Club.” The show opens April 26.

The Box in the Wood Theatre Guild is jumping in the deep end with its latest production, “The Dixie Swim Club.”

The show will premiere April 25, with six performances through May 4. All performances will be at the Mielke Arts Center, N5649 Airport Road, Shawano.

The play, written by Nicholas Hope, Jamie Wooten and Jessie Jones, focuses on five Southern women who were part of a college swim team in their youth. It takes the audience on a 33-year trip in the course of two hours as the women reunite several times to talk about the course their lives have taken and deal with hardships.

Sheree, the team captain, tries to maintain a perfect life, much to her teammates’ chagrin at times. Lexie tries to hold on to her youth as long as possible, while Dinah deals with being a successful attorney. Vernadette handles her existence with an acerbic tongue, and Jeri Neal leaves the life of a nun behind to become a mother late in life.

Thu
17
Apr

Church plans Good Friday cross walk

Area residents will help carry a cross through Shawano on Friday as part of a Good Friday program sponsored by the United Methodist Church.

The cross walk will begin at 9 a.m. across the street from the Shawano County Courthouse, 311 N. Main St., with a brief reading of the scriptures and an opening prayer. The group will travel south on Main Street to East Lieg Avenue, turn east onto Lieg Avenue and have a second brief scripture reading, then continue to South Evergreen Street. The cross walk continues on Birch Lane Road to Engel Drive and the United Methodist Church property. The cross will be carried to a spot overlooking the city and conclude with a brief scripture reading and prayer.

There will be cars following the route for those who may not be able to walk the entire distance. Car pooling is encouraged, and participants may gather in the United Methodist Church parking lot before car pooling to the starting point.

Thu
17
Apr

Menominee holding sturgeon feast Saturday

The Menominee Nation will celebrate the return of the sturgeon with a feast and celebration pow-wow Saturday at Menominee Indian High School, N500 State Highway 47, Keshena.

Grand entries will be held at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m., with the feast at 5 p.m.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has agreed to provide the Menominee Nation with the 15 lake sturgeon for the annual cultural event. The revival of the sturgeon feast and celebration began in 1973 when tribal leaders initiated talks with the DNR for sturgeon to be brought to the reservation for the celebration.

The annual spring migration of the Lake Winnebago sturgeon to Keshena Falls was halted when dams were built on the Wolf River near Shawano in the late 1800s. Prior to the dams, the sturgeon for centuries migrated from the Lake Winnebago water system to their traditional spawning grounds at Keshena Falls.

Fri
11
Apr

Nonprofit Profile


Photo by Carol Wagner The Senior Gift Shop in the Civic Center is the home of many homemade treasures. Mary Ann Rudie, left, and Geri Van De Loo volunteer in the shop. Kiara Johnson, 5, Van De Loo’s granddaughter, looks over the jewelry.

People are still surprised when they find the Senior Gift Shop, even though it has been part of the Shawano Civic Center since it was constructed in 1983. The original plan included a shop to hold the homemade treasures of senior crafters.

“So many people say ‘I never even knew you were there,’” said Geri Van De Loo.

Van De Loo and Mary Ann Rudie are trying to make the public more aware of the shop.

“It’s nice for the older people to have a place to make things and sell them,” Rudie said.

Talented individuals and the Older Americans Group sell their items in the shop. Holiday items are always very popular.

“We have a lot of Easter and spring stuff,” Van De Loo said.

Fri
11
Apr

Long-awaited signs of spring appearing

A fly, drunkenly buzzing on my window pane, distracts me as I look out my office window toward the barn. Joining the fly, I count four ladybugs bound and determined to get somewhere. They look like they’re on a mission, but for the life of me I don’t know where they’re going nor why. I’m only slightly annoyed that they’re there, for their industrious appearance in the warm sunny window indicates that our long-awaited spring has indeed sprung.

The other morning, I saw a flock of geese overhead and I paused, craning my head way back, watching and listening to their sweet cadence. It sounded heavenly. On the way into the house for breakfast I noticed a couple of fat robins, pecking and building. Even the little starlings seemed to be more industrious, twittering madly. All creatures are awakening from a long, grueling winter. Me, too! Inhaling deeply, I relished the hint of warmth and let the rich, earthy country air fill my lungs.

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