Community

Fri
19
Apr

Colored eggs and Easter bonnets make holiday bright

I was raised in a Christian family. Mourning the death of Jesus on Good Friday and celebrating his resurrection on Easter were the focus and reason for our observance of the holiday. Like many families, we also had some traditions surrounding the holiday.

Mother always made sure I had a new Easter outfit, complete with a pretty bonnet, shoes and a colorful dress. We didn’t have a great deal of money, but Mother was conservative with her grocery money. Buying Easter clothes for me was very important to her. If there was money left, she would buy herself a hat. Mother always wore one to church. She loved hats. She also wore nylons with a seam down the back. I was so proud to sit next to her in church; I thought she looked like a movie star. She had a deep, distinctive voice, and I loved listening to her sing the traditional Easter hymns, “Christ our Lord has risen today, Hallelujah.”

Fri
19
Apr

Snow days in spring confound scheduled plans

Snow days in April are beginning to be a tradition in Wisconsin. Sure, it wasn’t the 30 inches of 2018, but the inches of 2019 came with a strong east wind plus thunder, lightning, sleet, freezing rain, and I, for one, was glad I decided to stay home. Many of my Facebook friends noted that it was the worst driving situation of the winter. I was thankful they got home from work safely.

After months of winter weather, I am not sure why that storm bothered me that much. I was snug in the house, and had no need to go out. From inside, the snow didn’t look too deep. However, when the plow went through, the huge pile at the end of the driveway told me it was deeper than it looked.

Fri
19
Apr

A MUCH AWAITED RETURN


Leader Photo by Lee Pulaski Don Reiter of the Menominee Conservation Department holds up a sturgeon for Terry Waupekenay, a teacher at Menominee Indian Middle School, to bless with traditional tobacco. Many tribal members got the opportunity to be up close and personal with the sturgeon, which is a vital part of Menominee culture.

It’s an annual tradition for many Menominee people to await the arrival of sturgeon from Lake Winnebago.

The wait came to an end this week, as the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources brought 34 sturgeon to Chickenay Creek near the Keshena Falls corridor of the Wolf River. More than 100 onlookers observed as DNR officials worked with Menominee tribal staff and some volunteer students.

For most onlookers along the Wolf River, seeing sturgeon is a fascinating wildlife experience. For the Menominee, however, the sturgeon are ingrained in their culture.

Terry Waupekenay, a Menominee culture and language teacher at Menominee Indian Middle School, brought over 45 students to the creek to see the sturgeon close up. For many of the students, it was their first time seeing their tribe’s sacred fish up close.

Wed
17
Apr

Veteran donates $25,000 to Clintonville memorial


Photo by Grace Kirchner Marine Corps veteran Butch Zabel, center, donates a check for $25,000 to the Veterans Memorial Committee to assist with an expansion to the memorial to Clintonville Mayor Richard Beggs, left, a member of the committee. They are joined by military veteran Harry Hamilton in front of the memorial, which is located at South Main Street in Clintonville.

Residents of Clintonville might recognize the longtime resident and former U.S. Marine who recently made the largest contribution to date to the Clintonville Veterans Memorial, but they might not know his real name.

U.S. Marine Sgt. Duane “Butch” Zabel, a 1950 graduate of Clintonville High School, said he’s had the nickname since birth.

“When I was born, I weighed 12 pounds and they called me ‘Butch,’ and it stuck,” Zabel said. “Many people don’t even know my name.”

After donating $25,000 to the Clintonville Veterans Memorial Committee on April 5, Zabel’s name will be forever inscribed on the wall.

“In acknowledgement of this special memorial, a stone of granite will be installed in a prominent location near the new wall segment, with a bronze plaque recognizing the honored veteran as a major donor,” said Mayor Richard Beggs, who accepted the donation on behalf of the committee.

Thu
11
Apr

Ms. Senior Homemaker Pageant coming in June

Everyone is a winner at the annual Ms. Senior Homemaker Pageant.

The event is set from noon to 4 p.m. June 6 with a light lunch from noon to 1 p.m. Program starts at 1:30 p.m. at the Shawano Lake County Park pavilion, W5791 Lake Drive, Shawano. There is free admission.

Register at the event for a chance to win many beautiful door prizes. Cash bar will be provided by Amvets.

Seven seniors over the age of 55 will compete for the crown. They will be judged by a panel of community professionals in the following areas: a homemade dessert; a special, meaningful outfit with a story behind its meaning; an optional talent; and participation on a multitasking table doing dishes, folding laundry, caring for a crying doll and answering a telemarketing call within 3 minutes.

Each contestant will also answer the Ms. Homemaker Question.

This year, the event will feature special guest Elvis John.

The 2018 winner was Patty Ambacher from Tigerton.

Thu
11
Apr

Rhonda Vincent and The Rage heading to Wittenberg


CONTRIBUTED PHOTO Rhonda Vincent and The Rage will perform at 4 p.m. Sunday at Wittenberg-Birnamwood High School.

Editor’s Note: This story appears in the April issue of Out & About in Wisconsin. Excerpts are reprinted with permission. The band’s concert is the last of a series of shows this year by Rob Wyman of Rubber Sole Productions.

There would be no rain delay for The Sally Mountain Show, not with Rhonda Vincent’s dad, Johnny Vincent, in charge.

Years ago, the family band was employed to perform their entertaining brand of bluegrass by Silver Dollar City in Branson, Missouri. One particular day Rhonda Vincent remembers, the weather outside was awful.

“We played there five days a week, Monday through Friday – five-hour shows a day,” said Rhonda, considered by many to be the “Queen of Bluegrass.” “We punched a time clock at 8 a.m. and punched out at 6.”

She and her brother, Darren, now a member of the Grammy-winning bluegrass duo Dailey & Vincent, thought they’d wait it out until the downpour subsided.

Thu
11
Apr

Clintonville alderman creates unique carvings


Photo by Grace Kirchner Clintonville Alderman Steve Kettenhoven shows some of the plaques he has carved. He initiates some of his own designs and creates custom-order pieces.

“If I can do it, you can do it,” has been Steve Kettenhoven’s motto for most of his life. Having been born with cerebral palsy, the condition may have slowed him down a bit, but it never stopped him from trying new experiences.

Carving is just his latest accomplishment.

Kettenhoven said he learned to carve and make wooden plaques for sale as a way to earn an income. Most of the wood pieces the Clintonville resident uses are cutoffs from a furniture factory, he said. When making wooden puzzles, his medium of choice is ¾-inch aspen, he said.

“The thicker wood makes the pieces more durable and allows puzzles to stand up on their own,” Kettenhoven said.

“The most difficult piece I’ve done is a hummingbird plaque. There were a number of intricate inside cuts that took many hours to complete.”

Wed
10
Apr

Striking a conversation or two while on the road

Due to the fact that I am a part-time farmer nowadays, I don’t have the material readily available to write about farming every other week. Instead, it seems I gravitate toward the happenings off the farm, and I am a little bummed by that — for after all, I’m a farm girl at heart. I would rather write about heading down the road on my tractor, pulling the chopper and wagon behind but unfortunately, those columns are becoming few and far between.

Instead, once in a while, I find myself writing about traveling to my different job assignments, which occasionally provide more material than is necessary to complete a column of approximately 900 words. Something my husband could relate to you in, say, closer to 20.

At any rate, one day as I drove back and forth to an assignment, I was carrying on a one-sided conversation with my fellow occupants of the road.

Wed
10
Apr

There are many ways to conquer that nagging cough

Like a bad penny, it’s back. Every year, late winter or early spring, I seem to get it. For lack of a better term, I call it the “creeping crud.” As soon as I feel the first symptom, I do what I can to lessen the effects. But try as I might, nothing really gets me past it. It seems it has to run its course.

I am really never quite sure if it is a viral infection, my asthma acting up, allergies, a sinus infection or just a plain old cold. The symptoms are always the same. Post-nasal drip, lots and lots of coughing, wheezing and an overwhelming feeling of weakness.

I am not opposed to going to see my doctor, but after getting this year after year, I have found nothing really knocks it out of me. It always lasts for a few weeks at least. However, if I would get a temperature, or green or dark-colored phlegm, I would most definitely head in to the clinic. I realize this crud could potentially turn into pneumonia, so I do pay close attention to my symptoms.

Wed
10
Apr

Memories creep to surface when you can’t fall asleep

Some nights, it doesn’t seem to matter how tired I am, I cannot fall asleep. I have learned to try to quiet my mind, drain away the thoughts that scurry back and forth. I try to think of all of the things I have to be thankful for, and list them one by one. But some nights, the brain keeps on running, and no matter how close I am to that restful sleep, it is elusive and skips away.

That night, I was thinking of toasted cheese sandwiches, and the first one I ever saw or ate. I never knew they existed until my oldest brother’s girlfriend (they eventually married) had come over to make us supper, and she did a very strange thing.

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